arab world – Liby Amazigh http://libyamazigh.org/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 15:14:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://libyamazigh.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-1-32x32.png arab world – Liby Amazigh http://libyamazigh.org/ 32 32 Star African tennis player to watch: Ons Jabeur https://libyamazigh.org/star-african-tennis-player-to-watch-ons-jabeur/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 15:14:04 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/star-african-tennis-player-to-watch-ons-jabeur/

LONDON, UK, January 15 – DStv viewers can expect to see African tennis star Ons Jabeur in Grand Slam action when the Australian Open kicks off from Monday January 17, 2022

SuperSport is the ultimate destination for tennis fans, with an unrivaled selection of action from around the world.

Tunisian Ons Jabeur has had a stellar 2021, reaching the peak of his career as world No. 7 – a record for the highest-ranked Arab tennis player in the history of the ATP or WTA rankings.

It was at the 2020 Australian Open that she became the first Arab woman to reach the quarter-finals of a Grand Slam tournament, which she reached again at the 2021 Wimbledon Championships.

Jabeur then won her first WTA title at the 2021 Birmingham Classic by defeating Daria Kasatkina, becoming the first-ever Amazigh/Arab and Tunisian tennis player to win a WTA title.

The 27-year-old, from Monastir in Tunisia, will look to continue her success in 2022 and come to the Australian Open in good standing, having shrugged off injury issues that plagued her at the end from last year. She also won the Mubadala World Tennis Championship last month, beating Olympic gold medalist Belinda Bencic.

“It was a crazy trip to come here, but as I said before, it has always been a dream for me to come and play here at Mubadala,” Jabeur said. “It’s amazing to be here in Abu Dhabi; to be here in an Arab country, to represent Tunisia, to represent the Arab world. I’m so glad I got this opportunity, so I’m really grateful for it.

“I hadn’t played since Moscow and it’s been forever, so it was good to play some points and it felt like a real game. Belinda plays very well, so it was difficult at times.

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Regarding his ambitions for the new year, Jabeur explained: “I like challenges and saying goals out loud. I want to keep breaking records and keep making history; give more than one example for the athletes out there. I want to continue my path and win more titles, prove to myself that I deserve a place in the top 10. I am very ambitious to [2022].”

No rival can match SuperSport’s coverage. Our viewers on DStv can see all of their favorite tennis stars dominating courts around the world. Visit www.dstv.com to subscribe or upgrade, and join in the excitement. And while you’re on the go, you can stream matches on the DStv app.

Check out Ons Jabeur in action at the Australian Open next week:

All time CAT

monday january 17

02:00: Main stream, day session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

02:00: second feeding – INHABIT on SuperSport Action

10:00 a.m.: main feed, night session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

tuesday january 18

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02:00: Main stream, daytime session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

02:00: second feeding – INHABIT on SuperSport Action

10:00 a.m.: main feed, night session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

Wednesday January 19

02:00: Main stream, day session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

02:00: second feeding – INHABIT on SuperSport Action

10:00 a.m.: main feed, night session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

Thursday January 20

02:00: Main stream, day session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

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02:00: second feeding – INHABIT on SuperSport Action

10:00 a.m.: main feed, night session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

Friday January 21

02:00: Main stream, day session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

02:00: second feeding – INHABIT on SuperSport Action

10:00 a.m.: main feed, night session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

saturday 22 january

02:00: Main stream, day session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

02:00: second feeding – INHABIT on SuperSport Action

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10:00 a.m.: main feed, night session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

Sunday January 23

02:00: Main stream, day session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

02:00: second feeding – INHABIT on SuperSport Variety 1

10:00 a.m.: main feed, night session – INHABIT on Super Sport Tennis

]]>
Yemen faces growing hunger and economic collapse amid escalating war, UN says https://libyamazigh.org/yemen-faces-growing-hunger-and-economic-collapse-amid-escalating-war-un-says/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/yemen-faces-growing-hunger-and-economic-collapse-amid-escalating-war-un-says/

Escalating military action in Yemen has displaced more than 15,000 people over the past month, killed or injured more than 350 civilians in December and left the Arab world’s poorest country facing growing hunger and a economic collapse with no political solution in sight, senior UN officials said on Wednesday. .

UN special envoy Hans Grundberg told the UN Security Council that in the seventh year of conflict, the warring parties appear to be seeking military victory. But, he said, “there is no durable long-term solution to be found on the battlefield” and both sides must talk even if they are not ready to lay down their arms.

Yemen’s civil war began in 2014 when Houthi rebels took the capital Sanaa and much of the north of the country, forcing the government to flee south and then into Saudi Arabia.

A Saudi-led coalition, backed at the time by the United States, went to war months later seeking to restore the government to power, but the alliance, like the Houthis and other factions combatant in Yemen, has been accused of perpetrating serious violations by rights groups. .

The conflict has since escalated into a regional proxy war that has killed tens of thousands of civilians and combatants. The war has also created the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, leaving millions to suffer food and medical shortages and pushing the country to the brink of famine.

“We seem to be entering a cycle of escalation once again with foreseeable devastating implications for civilians and for the immediate prospects for peace,” Grundberg told the council.

Iran-backed Houthi rebels continue their assault on the key town of Marib, the government’s last stronghold in northern Yemen, and fighting resumes in the southern province of Shabwa where the internationally recognized Yemeni government has taken over three districts from Houthis, he said. .

Elsewhere, airstrikes have increased not only on the front lines but also in Sanaa, including residential areas, and in the city of Taiz, he said, while fighting continues in southern Hodeidah, where the main port of the country is located, and that the attacks have multiplied. to neighboring Saudi Arabia.

Grundberg expressed concern that battles could escalate on other fronts, pointing to the recent seizure by the Houthis of a vessel flying the flag of the United Arab Emirates. He also called “worrying” accusations that the mainly Houthi-controlled ports of Hodeidah – a lifeline for delivering aid, food and fuel to the country – are militarised.

Ramesh Rajasingham, the UN’s deputy humanitarian affairs chief, said heavy fighting continued along dozens of front lines and that as of December 358 civilians were reported killed or injured, “a figure that is on par with highest in three years.

He said aid agencies helped 11 million Yemenis every month in 2021, but the UN World Food Program was forced to cut food aid to 8 million people due to a lack of food. funding. Other programs providing water, protection of civilians and reproductive health services have also been forced to scale back or close in recent weeks due to a lack of funds, he said.

Last year’s UN appeal for around $3.9 billion to help 16 million people was only 58% funded – the lowest level since 2015 – and Rajasingham said the he UN expects this year’s aid operation to require about as much money. He urged donors to maintain and if possible increase their support this year.

Rajaingham also called on the Houthis in particular to improve access for humanitarian personnel and to end attempts to interfere in their work. Despite assurances from the Houthis, he said, they had still not allowed access to two UN staff members detained in Sanaa in November.

While humanitarian aid is essential, Rajasingham pointed out that the main drivers of people’s needs are economic collapse accelerated by conflict.

He said humanitarian needs could be reduced by a resumption of foreign exchange injections through the Central Bank as well as policy decisions to lift import restrictions and use import revenues to pay for basic services provided by public institutions.

]]> Meet the delegation of Jewish and Arab “Angels of Peace” https://libyamazigh.org/meet-the-delegation-of-jewish-and-arab-angels-of-peace/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 17:12:00 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/meet-the-delegation-of-jewish-and-arab-angels-of-peace/

“I have heard a lot of terrible things about Israel,” said Fatima El-Harabi, 30, a writer from Bahrain. “I thought the Arabs were living there under oppression, that the war there never ends. But then the Abraham’s accords were signed and the atmosphere started to change. A connection with the Israelis was established via social media, and I received an invitation to visit Israel, ”she continued.

“I decided to put aside my hesitation and see Israel with my own eyes. So, I traveled, I met Jews, I met Arabs, I also met Palestinians, and I was amazed.

6 בגלריה

1

Fatima El-Harabi on the right

“None of what I was told was true,” said El-Harabi, who is from Saudi Arabia and has already published five books.

“There are people who look like me, there is no sense of war there, the streets are full of restaurants and beaches, and I have even met people who have become my friends. However, when I got back to Bahrain there were some harsh reactions, they said I was a traitor, but many others were just curious. People wanted to know more about Israel, so I joined “Sharaka (The Gulf-Israel Center for Social Entrepreneurship) and I traveled to Israel for a second visit.

This is what the author said last week on the prestigious stage of the Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco, America’s oldest public affairs forum, which has hosted the most prominent public figures, including presidents. The audience there was overwhelmingly liberal, perhaps even progressive, but unlike what usually happens in pro-Israel events, they didn’t interrupt anyone this time. Instead, they listened.

“She puzzled me a bit,” a woman who heard El-Harabi told me, “that’s not how I thought of Israel.”

Also among the speakers were Chama Mechtalty, a Moroccan multidisciplinary artist; Hayvi Bouzo, a journalist who grew up in Damascus in a mixed family – Syrian, Kurdish and Turkish; Omar Al Busaidi from Dubai; Lorna El Khatib, Israeli-Arab-Druze, and Dan Feferman who made their aliyah in Israel from the United States.

They were all there to introduce the Jewish and non-Jewish American public to the benefits of the Abrahamic Accords. They held three meetings a day throughout the San Francisco Bay Area: in Jewish communities, on campuses, and even in private homes.

6 בגלריה

11

Judeo-Arab members of the “Sharaka” delegation of the Gulf-Arab initiative in San Francisco

Needless to say, the San Francisco Bay Area is possibly the most anti-Israel place on American soil. During the Gaza war in May, known as Operation Guardian of the Walls, an Israeli diplomat told me that anti-Israel protests were taking place on every street corner, but a young delegation made up mostly of Arabs. has sowed doubt in the hearts of American progressives.

This could be because the speakers conveyed a message about Jews and Arabs refusing to be enemies instead of another cliché slogan about Israel as the oppressor.

During a delegation meeting at a synagogue, a member of the audience asked, “How can you present the Abraham’s Accords in a positive light, when they were made by a dictator like Benjamin Netanyahu?” The Syrian member of the delegation replied: “I have lived quite a long time under a dictatorship, my family is still suffering in Aleppo and Damascus, and I cannot even be in contact with them as it could endanger them. you have to love Netanyahu, but even the leaders you don’t like can do great things, and peace between Arab countries and Israel is a good thing. ”

After his answer, the spectator who asked the question almost disappeared in his chair because he did not expect such a response from a Syrian journalist.

Chama Mechtalty addressed the audience in the language of art. She says she grew up in Casablanca and is of Amazigh origin. When she grew up, she discovered that her paternal grandfather was a Jew who had converted to Islam. “I live with a lot of identities,” she said. “Spiritually, I also feel Jewish, and my art is based on many cultures of Morocco and the region, both mosques and synagogues.

6 בגלריה

Photo: Screenshot from YouTubePhoto: Screenshot from YouTube

Hayvi Bouzo

(Photo: Screenshot from YouTube)

“When I was looking for a university in the United States, I actually felt connected to Brandeis University, which is identified as a ‘Jewish university’, and I felt at home there,” she said. .

Mechtalty also mentioned that she promotes peace through her art and indeed in her jewelry collections you can find the Star of David.

The Palestinian question has been brought up in every meeting, and always from the same point of view: it is very well what you are trying to do, but you neglect the Palestinian cause – because apparently it is the main problem in the Middle East.

Members of the delegation made it clear that they were not attached to any political position. The Dubai MP said that with regard to the United Arab Emirates, by signing a normalization agreement with Israel, the Gulf State “has not abandoned the Palestinians, and we want the peace accords to include them. also”.

“We always help them, despite their hostility, but we cannot remain their hostages. If the Palestinians find it difficult to make peace, are we supposed to continue with the old ways of boycott and hate? We tried, it didn’t work. So now we want to show them that peace with Israel is good for everyone. “

6 בגלריה

Chama MechtaltyChama Mechtalty

Chama Mechtalty

(Photo: Screenshot from YouTube)

Dan Feferman, researcher at the Jewish People Policy Institute presented the Israeli position with considerable talent and in-depth knowledge of American politics. While Lorna El Khatib, who identifies as Arab, Israeli and Druze, said “the Abraham Accords gave Arab Israelis access to the Arab world. And although Israel is not a perfect country, it is a lie to say that it is an apartheid country ”.

The Middle East is now divided into two groups. On the one hand, there is the group which includes Iran, Hezbollah, Hamas, the jihadists and all those who hate Israel. On the other, there is a new growing community of Jews and Arabs who support peace through mutual respect, while seeking to end hostilities, with common interests that can help whoever chooses the path of peace. .

Ironically, the first group, the one that continues to insist on boycotts and hate, consists of many progressives who support BDS, traveling from campus to campus, spreading the lie that Israel is an apartheid state that commits crimes. of war. So which band do you prefer? The one who promotes normalization and peace or the one who promotes demonization and hatred? This question was asked at one of the meetings, causing embarrassment among progressives.

It is usually the pro-Israelis who feel uncomfortable in these forums. But a Judeo-Arab group, especially Arab, made some sort of change this time around.

6 בגלריה

Omar Al BusaidiOmar Al Busaidi

Omar Al Busaidi

(Photo: Screenshot from YouTube)

Progressives who met the delegation heard things that gave them goosebumps and that’s great. When Sharaka founder Amit Deri asked me to join the delegation, he told me that they had found a better way to fight demonization. “Arabs and Jews who speak different languages. Not against Israel, not against the Palestinians, but for peace, for normalization.”

The number of Sharaka members in Arab countries is only growing, there are already branches in Dubai, Bahrain, Morocco, and there are also supporters who are joining the virtual activity from other countries as well. There are also those who oppose this idea, and the more it grows, the more people will oppose it.

Sacramento, the capital of California, is not known for its sympathy towards Israel. Even its Jewish mayor, Darrell Steinberg, had previously expressed very hostile views towards Israel. “I do not recognize the Israel I love,” he wrote during Operation Guardian of the Walls. And yet he came to the meeting with Sharaka’s delegation.

I saw him sitting in his chair, looking surprised at what he heard. He was joined by an Egyptian businessman, Kais Menoufy. I spoke with the two after the event, they were both excited. Menoufy was among the first Egyptian officers to cross the Suez Canal during the Yom Kippur War in 1973, he also captured the first Israeli prisoner, and for his part in the war he was awarded one of the highest medals of honor in Egypt. “I liked the message,” he told me after hearing the speakers and inviting them all to Sacramento’s most prestigious restaurant.

6 בגלריה

11

The delegation to the Commonwealth Club of California event

(Photo: Screenshot from YouTube)

“I want to help and contribute,” he said. He also came to another meeting, held at Gina and Daniel Waldman’s house, to continue the dialogue. Gina founded the organization “Jimena”, which deals with the heritage, culture and history of Arab Jews, a chapter less familiar to American Jews.

When Shabbat came, the tour ended. The delegation was staying in Palo Alto, with Rabbi Serena Eisenberg and her Israeli husband, Dr Yaron Zimler. The Arab members of the delegation sang with us “Shalom Aleichem”, which is a traditional Jewish poem commonly sung at the start of a Shabbat meal and which means “peace be upon you”.

Some of the words were similar to the Arabic greeting “salam alaikum” so they wanted to know more about the song. They were told that there was no more appropriate song for this delegation and for tonight, since this song is about angels of peace, and they really are angels of peace.

The Arab members were touched, and there was a moment of silence, during which I even noticed a few tears, and perhaps the start of a whole new era in Arab-Israeli relations.

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Abu Dhabi Festival Presents Fusion Concert Featuring … https://libyamazigh.org/abu-dhabi-festival-presents-fusion-concert-featuring/ https://libyamazigh.org/abu-dhabi-festival-presents-fusion-concert-featuring/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 12:51:59 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/abu-dhabi-festival-presents-fusion-concert-featuring/

(MENAFN- Hattlan Media) In its 18th edition and under the theme “The future begins now”, the Abu Dhabi Festival (ADF) announces a unique concert at BOZAR in Brussels, Belgium on November 11. The event, co-produced by the Abu Dhabi Festival in partnership with the Palace of Fine Arts of Belgium, will present a fusion of Fasl and Arab-Andalusian classical music by pillars of each profession.

The public is promised a night of great melodies and a sensational encounter of cultures from all over the world. The Moroccan Mohamed Briouel, master of Arab-Andalusian music, collaborates with the Turkish specialist of Fasl Kudsi Erguner, synonymous with Ottoman Sufi music. Performer and teacher, he is above all one of the greatest Turkish virtuosos of the ney, oblique flute.

HE Huda Ebrahim Alkhamis, Founder of Abu Dhabi Music & Arts Foundation (ADMAF) and Artistic Director of Abu Dhabi Festival, said: “Our support to Arab artists abroad, to bring the wonder and beauty of music from the Arab world to audiences all over the world. the globe, is at the heart of the Abu Dhabi Festival. Mohamed Briouel, figurehead of Arab-Andalusian music, and the master of Ottoman music Kudsi Erguner, getting together is an essential meeting. Their creative collaboration celebrates the meeting of cultures through music and represents the efforts of the Abu Dhabi Festival to build bridges of understanding between peoples and nations.

In addition to the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Brussels, the partners of the Abu Dhabi Festival for the spectacle are BOZAR MUSIC, the Darna Cultural Center, the Center des arts nomades Moussem, Seyer Music and the non-profit association Takasim.

Arab-Andalusian and Ottoman music are the result of intercultural encounters. The two genres have a long history of socially rewarding and intellectually stimulating fusion. In the former there are flavors of medieval Spanish, Afro-Berber and Arabic tunes while the latter has been influenced by Turkish, Arabic, Persian, Greek, Jewish and Armenian melodies.

The concert at BOZAR Hall is the product of months of collaboration between musicians from Morocco, Turkey and Belgium. The participating team attended several workshops and masterclasses on both styles of classical music, resulting in a captivating performance.
The 18th edition of the Abu Dhabi Festival is supported by its main partner Mubadala Investment Company (Mubadala) and its energy partner GS Energy.

The 18th edition’s one-year program combines a unique hybrid program of virtual and in-person performances, exhibitions and events by more than 500 artists from more than 50 countries. The festival will offer the public 16 exciting world premieres, 12 festival productions, eight global co-productions and four exclusive commissions, along with 1 world musical tour.

MENAFN09112021004445000617ID1103129842

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Artists and critics join Riyadh Art Memento exhibition focus groups https://libyamazigh.org/artists-and-critics-join-riyadh-art-memento-exhibition-focus-groups/ https://libyamazigh.org/artists-and-critics-join-riyadh-art-memento-exhibition-focus-groups/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 00:54:48 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/artists-and-critics-join-riyadh-art-memento-exhibition-focus-groups/

PARIS: “Somewhere between silence and words” revives memories of a trip to Algeria made by Florian Gaite, philosopher, art critic and curator of the exhibition which runs until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des Arts Malakoff centers in Paris.

The exhibit “seeks to bring forth the voices and silence that characterize Algeria so well,” Gaité told Arab News in France.

“It is an attentive ear beyond the Mediterranean. Algeria is a country as well known as it is unknown, and whose complexity – social, political and historical – is equivalent to the cultural diversity expressed there.

Gaite said he set up the project before the Hirak movement and the widespread protests in Algeria in early 2019.

“It upset my vision of the Algerian scene, a country that I did not know, and on which I had prejudices and preconceived ideas from an exclusively Western reading,” he added.

“When I arrived in Algeria, I realized that the sensitive and sensory experience felt there was made up of two extremes. On the one hand, it is an extremely talkative country, where several languages ​​are spoken, a kind of linguistic tinkering. The same language is not spoken from city to city or between generations.

“The older generation speaks Amazigh, their children speak French and Arabic, and the younger generation is more Arabic and English oriented. This stratification of languages ​​seemed crazy to me because in Algeria, there is also a lot of silence. It is a country where people whisper, where there is modesty, ”he said.

Gaite said Algeria is a country “marked by many traumas and a form of detention” because the same injuries are not discussed between generations.

“There are two pitfalls that I wanted to avoid: The first is to place myself in Western criticism coming to evoke the Algerian artistic scene, in which I am not specialized. The second consisted in choosing artists as simple mediators to bear witness to the Algerian. artistic scene. In fact, they know their country better than I do and their testimonies are more accurate and authentic.

According to the organizer of the exhibition, colonization, Islamism and state authoritarianism are among the many traumas in contemporary Algerian history.

“These are a series of causes, prohibitions, denials, repressions that hinder speech and often prevent its transcription in the form of a story. The presence of the testimony and documentary function in contemporary Algerian art thus responds to this need to bear witness to the past as well as the present – colonization, the war of liberation, socialism, the black decade, the Bouteflika era, the Hirak – and to propose rewritings, to unearth what has been erased or falsified, to give a voice to all that is forgotten, ”he declared.

“Somewhere between silence and words” brings together artists born, living or working in Algeria, including Louisa Babari, Adel Bentounsi, Walid Bouchouchi, Fatima Chafaa, Dalila Dalleas Bouzar, Mounir Gouri, Fatima Idiri, Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, Amina Menia and Sadek Rahim.

These Algerian or Franco-Algerian artists were selected by Gaité, who specifies that some are still poorly represented in French galleries.

“This exhibition, which includes more women than men, presents works made with various materials such as paper, charcoal or even fabric.

While in Oran, birthplace of Gaité’s grandmother, the curator met Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, a Franco-Algerian director, who introduced her to her mother, Fatima Idiri.

Born in Aurès, in northeastern Algeria, Idiri lived in Nancy in a family that was part of the resistance networks of the National Liberation Front.

Returning to the country after her independence, she is a self-taught artist – from styling to painting on silk, from mosaic to Berber embroidery – strongly influenced by Impressionism and Orientalism.

“The Hirak’s fervor has been a game-changer,” she said.

By choosing figurative drawing as an artistic identity, she strives to preserve the memory of one of the traditions of her native region, the Aurès, says Gaité.

“By creating his masterpieces from coffee grounds and acrylic, the artist pays homage to the free and liberated poets and singers that are Azriat.

Idiri studies colonial photography and seeks to deconstruct images to rediscover the spontaneity of avant-garde artists frowned upon, even marginalized, during the colonial period.

The exhibition also includes works by Mounir Gouri, winner of the Friends of the IMA (Arab World Institute) prize.

Based in France, Gouri produces moving paintings of “harraga”, or illegal immigrants, turning their journey into a performance.

Gaité highlights a painting of a starry sky, painted in charcoal. “The message that the artist wishes to convey is that when the harraga are in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea in the dark night, the stars are their only source of light.

Works by the visual artist Amina Menia, who lives and works in Algeria, are also on display. His art takes the form of an urban archeology, centered on places and architectural language.

Menia’s works have been exhibited in numerous museums, art centers and galleries, including the Center Pompidou in Paris, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Museum of African Design in Johannesburg, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Marseille and the Royal Hibernian Academy of Dublin.

Works by Sadek Rahim, a multidisciplinary artist who lived in Syria and Jordan, and studied at the Beirut School of Fine Arts, are also presented.

“Somewhere between silence and words” takes place until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des arts de Malakoff, in the Hauts-de-Seine, in Paris.

This story was originally published in French on Arab News in English

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World’s oldest ghost image found on the British Museum’s Babylon Tablet https://libyamazigh.org/worlds-oldest-ghost-image-found-on-the-british-museums-babylon-tablet/ https://libyamazigh.org/worlds-oldest-ghost-image-found-on-the-british-museums-babylon-tablet/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 18:51:39 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/worlds-oldest-ghost-image-found-on-the-british-museums-babylon-tablet/

PARIS: “Somewhere between silence and words” revives memories of a trip to Algeria made by Florian Gaite, philosopher, art critic and curator of the exhibition which runs until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des Arts Malakoff centers in Paris.

The exhibit “seeks to convey the voices and silence that characterize Algeria so well,” Gaité told Arab News in France.

“It is an attentive ear beyond the Mediterranean. Algeria is a country as well known as it is unknown, and whose complexity – social, political and historical – is equivalent to the cultural diversity expressed there.

Gaite said he set up the project before the Hirak movement and the widespread protests in Algeria in early 2019.

“It upset my vision of the Algerian scene, a country that I did not know, and on which I had prejudices and preconceived ideas from an exclusively Western reading,” he added.

“When I arrived in Algeria, I realized that the sensitive and sensory experience felt there was made up of two extremes. On the one hand, it is an extremely talkative country, where several languages ​​are spoken, a kind of linguistic tinkering. The same language is not spoken from city to city or between generations.

“The older generation speaks Amazigh, their children speak French and Arabic, and the younger generation is more Arabic and English oriented. This stratification of languages ​​seemed crazy to me because in Algeria, there is also a lot of silence. It is a country where people whisper, where there is modesty, ”he said.

Gaite said Algeria is a country “marked by many traumas and by a form of detention” because the same injuries are not discussed between generations.

“There are two pitfalls that I wanted to avoid: The first is to place myself as a Western critic coming to evoke the Algerian artistic scene, in which I am not specialized. The second consisted in choosing artists as simple mediators to bear witness to the Algerian. artistic scene. In fact, they know their country better than I do and their testimonies are more accurate and authentic.

According to the organizer of the exhibition, colonization, Islamism and state authoritarianism are among the many traumas in contemporary Algerian history.

“These are a series of causes, prohibitions, denials, repressions that hinder speech and often prevent its transcription in the form of a story. The presence of the testimony and documentary function in contemporary Algerian art thus responds to this need to bear witness to the past as well as the present – colonization, the war of liberation, socialism, the black decade, the Bouteflika era, the Hirak – and to propose rewritings, to exhume what has been erased or falsified, to give a voice to all that is forgotten, ”he declared.

“Somewhere between silence and words” brings together artists born, living or working in Algeria, including Louisa Babari, Adel Bentounsi, Walid Bouchouchi, Fatima Chafaa, Dalila Dalleas Bouzar, Mounir Gouri, Fatima Idiri, Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, Amina Menia and Sadek Rahim.

These Algerian or Franco-Algerian artists were selected by Gaité, who specifies that some are still poorly represented in French galleries.

“This exhibition, which includes more women than men, presents works made with various materials such as paper, charcoal or even fabric.

While in Oran, birthplace of Gaité’s grandmother, the curator met Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, a Franco-Algerian director, who introduced her to her mother, Fatima Idiri.

Born in Aurès, in northeastern Algeria, Idiri lived in Nancy in a family that was part of the resistance networks of the National Liberation Front.

Returning to the country after her independence, she is a self-taught artist – from styling to painting on silk, from mosaic to Berber embroidery – strongly influenced by Impressionism and Orientalism.

“Hirak’s fervor has changed the game,” she said.

By choosing figurative drawing as an artistic identity, she strives to preserve the memory of one of the traditions of her native region, the Aurès, says Gaité.

“By creating his masterpieces from coffee grounds and acrylic, the artist pays homage to the free and liberated poets and singers that are Azriat.

Idiri studies colonial photography and seeks to deconstruct images in order to rediscover the spontaneity of avant-garde artists frowned upon, even marginalized, during the colonial period.

The exhibition also includes works by Mounir Gouri, winner of the Friends of the IMA (Arab World Institute) prize.

Based in France, Gouri produces moving paintings of “harraga”, or illegal immigrants, turning their journey into a performance.

Gaité highlights a painting of a starry sky, painted in charcoal. “The message that the artist wishes to convey is that when the harraga are in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea in the dark night, the stars are their only source of light.

Works by the visual artist Amina Menia, who lives and works in Algeria, are also on display. His art takes the form of an urban archeology, centered on places and architectural language.

Menia’s works have been exhibited in numerous museums, art centers and galleries, including the Center Pompidou in Paris, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Museum of African Design in Johannesburg, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Marseille and the Royal Hibernian Academy of Dublin.

Works by Sadek Rahim, a multidisciplinary artist who lived in Syria and Jordan, and studied at the Beirut School of Fine Arts, are also presented.

“Somewhere between silence and words” takes place until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des arts de Malakoff, in the Hauts-de-Seine, in Paris.

This story was originally published in French on Arab News in English

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Silence speaks volumes as Algerian artists explore cultural heritage https://libyamazigh.org/silence-speaks-volumes-as-algerian-artists-explore-cultural-heritage/ https://libyamazigh.org/silence-speaks-volumes-as-algerian-artists-explore-cultural-heritage/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 09:45:59 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/silence-speaks-volumes-as-algerian-artists-explore-cultural-heritage/

PARIS: “Somewhere between silence and words” revives memories of a trip to Algeria made by Florian Gaite, philosopher, art critic and curator of the exhibition which runs until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des Arts Malakoff centers in Paris.

The exhibit “seeks to convey the voices and silence that characterize Algeria so well,” Gaité told Arab News in France.

“It is an attentive ear beyond the Mediterranean. Algeria is a country as well known as it is unknown, and whose complexity – social, political and historical – is equivalent to the cultural diversity expressed there.

Gaite said he set up the project before the Hirak movement and the widespread protests in Algeria in early 2019.

“It upset my vision of the Algerian scene, a country that I did not know, and on which I had prejudices and preconceived ideas from an exclusively Western reading,” he added.

“When I arrived in Algeria, I realized that the sensitive and sensory experience felt there was made up of two extremes. On the one hand, it is an extremely talkative country, where several languages ​​are spoken, a kind of linguistic tinkering. The same language is not spoken from city to city or between generations.

“The older generation speaks Amazigh, their children speak French and Arabic, and the younger generation is more Arabic and English oriented. This stratification of languages ​​seemed crazy to me because in Algeria, there is also a lot of silence. It is a country where people whisper, where there is modesty, ”he said.

Gaite said Algeria is a country “marked by many traumas and by a form of detention” because the same injuries are not discussed between generations.

“There are two pitfalls that I wanted to avoid: The first is to place myself as a Western critic coming to evoke the Algerian artistic scene, in which I am not specialized. The second consisted in choosing artists as simple mediators to bear witness to the Algerian. artistic scene. In fact, they know their country better than I do and their testimonies are more accurate and authentic.

According to the organizer of the exhibition, colonization, Islamism and state authoritarianism are among the many traumas in contemporary Algerian history.

“These are a series of causes, prohibitions, denials, repressions that hinder speech and often prevent its transcription in the form of a story. The presence of the testimony and documentary function in contemporary Algerian art thus responds to this need to bear witness to the past as well as the present – colonization, the war of liberation, socialism, the black decade, the Bouteflika era, the Hirak – and to propose rewritings, to exhume what has been erased or falsified, to give a voice to all that is forgotten, ”he declared.

“Somewhere between silence and words” brings together artists born, living or working in Algeria, including Louisa Babari, Adel Bentounsi, Walid Bouchouchi, Fatima Chafaa, Dalila Dalleas Bouzar, Mounir Gouri, Fatima Idiri, Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, Amina Menia and Sadek Rahim.

These Algerian or Franco-Algerian artists were selected by Gaité, who specifies that some are still poorly represented in French galleries.

“This exhibition, which includes more women than men, presents works made with various materials such as paper, charcoal or even fabric.

While in Oran, birthplace of Gaité’s grandmother, the curator met Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, a Franco-Algerian director, who introduced her to her mother, Fatima Idiri.

Born in Aurès, in northeastern Algeria, Idiri lived in Nancy in a family that was part of the resistance networks of the National Liberation Front.

Returning to the country after her independence, she is a self-taught artist – from styling to painting on silk, from mosaic to Berber embroidery – strongly influenced by Impressionism and Orientalism.

“Hirak’s fervor has changed the game,” she said.

By choosing figurative drawing as an artistic identity, she strives to preserve the memory of one of the traditions of her native region, the Aurès, says Gaité.

“By creating his masterpieces from coffee grounds and acrylic, the artist pays homage to the free and liberated poets and singers that are Azriat.

Idiri studies colonial photography and seeks to deconstruct images in order to rediscover the spontaneity of avant-garde artists frowned upon, even marginalized, during the colonial period.

The exhibition also includes works by Mounir Gouri, winner of the Friends of the IMA (Arab World Institute) prize.

Based in France, Gouri produces moving paintings of “harraga”, or illegal immigrants, turning their journey into a performance.

Gaité highlights a painting of a starry sky, painted in charcoal. “The message that the artist wishes to convey is that when the harraga are in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea in the dark night, the stars are their only source of light.

Works by the visual artist Amina Menia, who lives and works in Algeria, are also on display. His art takes the form of an urban archeology, centered on places and architectural language.

Menia’s works have been exhibited in numerous museums, art centers and galleries, including the Center Pompidou in Paris, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Museum of African Design in Johannesburg, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Marseille and the Royal Hibernian Academy of Dublin.

Works by Sadek Rahim, a multidisciplinary artist who lived in Syria and Jordan, and studied at the Beirut School of Fine Arts, are also presented.

“Somewhere between silence and words” takes place until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des arts de Malakoff, in the Hauts-de-Seine, in Paris.

This story was originally published in French on Arab News in English

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Egyptian model agency “decolonizes beauty standards” https://libyamazigh.org/egyptian-model-agency-decolonizes-beauty-standards/ https://libyamazigh.org/egyptian-model-agency-decolonizes-beauty-standards/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 10:54:37 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/egyptian-model-agency-decolonizes-beauty-standards/

CAIRO: Between the frantic rush of wardrobe changes and the photographers preparing for the shoots, Iman Eldeeb’s agency is slowly innovating for the Egyptian fashion scene by hiring a diverse range of models.

Eldeeb forged an international career in Milan, the fashion capital of Europe, where photographers told her she was “the first Egyptian model they had ever seen”.

Seven years later, she returned to Egypt in 2018 and set out to shake up a fashion scene where old stereotypes prevail.

In the most populous nation in the Arab world, modeling has long been dominated by “fair-skinned Eastern European girls,” Eldeeb said.


The 28-year-old said such “outdated” standards made it difficult for Egyptian and Arab models to enter the industry.

“Beauty cannot be limited by the appearance and shape of a face, etc. I think that’s a misconception of beauty, ”Eldeeb told AFP.

“The color of the hair, the color of the eyes, all of those things were part of a very old understanding of beauty and it’s something that we are moving away from as much as possible.”
According to The Fashion Spot, an industry-focused website, “models of color” made up over 43% of global fashion shows in fall 2021, making it “the most racially diverse season on record. “.

Traveling the world as a model, Eldeeb said she feels a new trend of more diverse faces and bodies is emerging.

Back in Egypt, she and her sister Yousra went on to found UNN Model Management – the name meaning ‘rebirth’ in the Nubian black minority language.

The agency provides a platform for aspiring talent in Egypt who lack support in the fiercely competitive industry.

“The fashion industry continues to develop in the Arab world,” Eldeeb said.

Today, UNN oversees around 35 contracts with major brands such as Louis Vuitton, Adidas and Levi’s, making it a leader in the nascent Egyptian scene.

Mohsen Othman, a freelance photographer also known as Lemosen who works regularly with UNN, praised the agency for its “bold” approach.

In the industry in Egypt, “we have creatives but we lack the means, and training remains outdated,” he said.

For Sabah Khodir, an Egyptian activist against gender-based violence, UNN is a force to “decolonize standards of beauty” and “to deconstruct internalized racism”.

“Being more represented in fashion, on screen or elsewhere, can save lives. It humanizes you in the eyes of the world, ”Khodir said of the plight of under-represented women.

South Sudanese model Adhar Makuac Abiem has long suffered racial taunts and slurs on the ruthless streets of Egypt’s bustling capital, Cairo.

When she moved to Egypt as a refugee in 2014, she never imagined she would be hired by a local agency.

She was often told that she was “too black” or “too ugly” to get a job, she said.

But since 2019, the 21-year-old has managed to build a modeling career by working with UNN.

Egypt is similar to “the West where prejudices persist about people with dark skin,” said Marie Grace Brown, a researcher at the University of Kansas and author of a book on women’s fashion in Sudan.

But that hasn’t stopped Abiem from trying to “become a positive role model” for young black women in the industry.

Mariam Abdallah, 22, who was busy doing her hair before a photoshoot, said she does more modeling abroad than in Egypt.

“We’re not very interested in ‘exotic’ top models,” she told AFP.

Beyond tackling discrimination in a highly predatory industry, where there have been high-profile cases of sexual misconduct, obtaining parental consent is another challenge in the conservative Muslim country.
According to Eldeeb, three quarters of parents fear that the images of their model daughters will be “abused” online.

There are also concerns about revealing clothing, as well as working “at inappropriate times” for young women.

“Whatever the profession, parents always try to decide for the girls,” “she added.

The World Bank says less than 20% of Egyptian women were employed in 2019.

But Eldeeb managed to get work visas for some of its models in France, a first for local talent.

Abdallah left Egypt for the first time recently thanks to the contracts she now has with a dozen agencies in Europe and the United States, giving her a sense of independence and raison d’être.

For activist Khodir, the focus on developing Egyptian talent for global fashion houses is more than just a good deal.

“It’s a form of healing that we badly need,” she said.


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Ancient Egyptian statues found in English garden https://libyamazigh.org/ancient-egyptian-statues-found-in-english-garden/ https://libyamazigh.org/ancient-egyptian-statues-found-in-english-garden/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 18:42:57 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/ancient-egyptian-statues-found-in-english-garden/

PARIS: “Somewhere between silence and words” revives memories of a trip to Algeria made by Florian Gaite, philosopher, art critic and curator of the exhibition which runs until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des Arts Malakoff centers in Paris.

The exhibit “seeks to convey the voices and silence that characterize Algeria so well,” Gaité told Arab News in France.

“It is an attentive ear beyond the Mediterranean. Algeria is a country as well known as it is unknown, and whose complexity – social, political and historical – is equivalent to the cultural diversity expressed there.

Gaite said he set up the project before the Hirak movement and the widespread protests in Algeria in early 2019.

“It upset my vision of the Algerian scene, a country that I did not know, and on which I had prejudices and preconceived ideas from an exclusively Western reading,” he added.

“When I arrived in Algeria, I realized that the sensitive and sensory experience felt there was made up of two extremes. On the one hand, it is an extremely talkative country, where several languages ​​are spoken, a kind of linguistic tinkering. The same language is not spoken from city to city or between generations.

“The older generation speaks Amazigh, their children speak French and Arabic, and the younger generation is more Arabic and English oriented. This stratification of languages ​​seemed crazy to me because in Algeria, there is also a lot of silence. It is a country where people whisper, where there is modesty, ”he said.

Gaite said Algeria is a country “marked by many traumas and by a form of detention” because the same injuries are not discussed between generations.

“There are two pitfalls that I wanted to avoid: The first is to place myself as a Western critic coming to evoke the Algerian artistic scene, in which I am not specialized. The second consisted in choosing artists as simple mediators to bear witness to the Algerian. artistic scene. In fact, they know their country better than I do and their testimonies are more accurate and authentic.

According to the organizer of the exhibition, colonization, Islamism and state authoritarianism are among the many traumas in contemporary Algerian history.

“These are a series of causes, prohibitions, denials, repressions that hinder speech and often prevent its transcription in the form of a story. The presence of the testimony and documentary function in contemporary Algerian art thus responds to this need to bear witness to the past as well as the present – colonization, the war of liberation, socialism, the black decade, the Bouteflika era, the Hirak – and to propose rewritings, to exhume what has been erased or falsified, to give a voice to all that is forgotten, ”he declared.

“Somewhere between silence and words” brings together artists born, living or working in Algeria, including Louisa Babari, Adel Bentounsi, Walid Bouchouchi, Fatima Chafaa, Dalila Dalleas Bouzar, Mounir Gouri, Fatima Idiri, Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, Amina Menia and Sadek Rahim.

These Algerian or Franco-Algerian artists were selected by Gaité, who specifies that some are still poorly represented in French galleries.

“This exhibition, which includes more women than men, presents works made with various materials such as paper, charcoal or even fabric.

While in Oran, birthplace of Gaité’s grandmother, the curator met Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, a Franco-Algerian director, who introduced her to her mother, Fatima Idiri.

Born in Aurès, in northeastern Algeria, Idiri lived in Nancy in a family that was part of the resistance networks of the National Liberation Front.

Returning to the country after her independence, she is a self-taught artist – from styling to painting on silk, from mosaic to Berber embroidery – strongly influenced by Impressionism and Orientalism.

“Hirak’s fervor has changed the game,” she said.

By choosing figurative drawing as an artistic identity, she strives to preserve the memory of one of the traditions of her native region, the Aurès, says Gaité.

“By creating his masterpieces from coffee grounds and acrylic, the artist pays homage to the free and liberated poets and singers that are Azriat.

Idiri studies colonial photography and seeks to deconstruct images in order to rediscover the spontaneity of avant-garde artists frowned upon, even marginalized, during the colonial period.

The exhibition also includes works by Mounir Gouri, winner of the Friends of the IMA (Arab World Institute) prize.

Based in France, Gouri produces moving paintings of “harraga”, or illegal immigrants, turning their journey into a performance.

Gaité highlights a painting of a starry sky, painted in charcoal. “The message that the artist wishes to convey is that when the harraga are in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea in the dark night, the stars are their only source of light.

Works by the visual artist Amina Menia, who lives and works in Algeria, are also on display. His art takes the form of an urban archeology, centered on places and architectural language.

Menia’s works have been exhibited in numerous museums, art centers and galleries, including the Center Pompidou in Paris, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Museum of African Design in Johannesburg, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Marseille and the Royal Hibernian Academy of Dublin.

Works by Sadek Rahim, a multidisciplinary artist who lived in Syria and Jordan, and studied at the Beirut School of Fine Arts, are also presented.

“Somewhere between silence and words” takes place until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des arts de Malakoff, in the Hauts-de-Seine, in Paris.

This story was originally published in French on Arab News in English

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Against Orientalism on Instagram – World – Al-Ahram Weekly https://libyamazigh.org/against-orientalism-on-instagram-world-al-ahram-weekly/ https://libyamazigh.org/against-orientalism-on-instagram-world-al-ahram-weekly/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/against-orientalism-on-instagram-world-al-ahram-weekly/

The crystal clear, translucent waters and the soft, slightly wavy white sand are surrounded by stones. The scenic green mountainous backdrop with perfect blue skies does not suggest Algeria. And few outside the North African country have heard of the ancient neighborhood in question, Collo, where forests, mountainous terrain, stunning beaches and Roman relics are only partially captured in the Instagram account, Kheir. , in the hope of redefining “the Middle East and North Africa [MENA] for real.”

There is a pun out there, kheir – which is the Arabic word for “good” – being driven by selfless principles. The organized Instagram “art and culture of travel” strives to finally put an end to stereotypes of the MENA region.

Yemen here is simply beautiful. In one video, a boy in rolled up blue jeans jumps off a white stone cliff into the turquoise water below. The narrow lagoon surrounded by a limestone precipice displays shades of green, yellow and aquamarine where the water meets the cliff of the island of Socotra in Yemen, in the northwest Indian Ocean , near the Gulf of Aden.

From her home in South Carolina, USA, curator Joy Camel scours different platforms daily looking for photos and videos of architecture and nature that she would like to see in the MENA region. . This labor of love is motivated by a deeper sense of “restoring” the region’s global representation.

“I know this can sound very grandiose,” Camel, 25, said in a telephone interview. But it works.

Launched in the spring of 2020, the striking Instagram account is a judicious selection of tireless images widely invested in the Arab world, but also includes Turkey, Iran and Afghanistan.

In his attention to detail Рthe textures, patterns, panoramas, even the faces of the region РKheir is a genuine effort by a young Egyptian-American to decolonize Arab tourism. Here, MENA is not the tired, historic and monolithic category still presented by Western media. Camel also shies away from the clich̩s of voluntarist Eastern otherness exported from the region to the Western public.

From northern Sudan: Nubian pyramids in the ancient city of Meroe. Lush landscapes of Wadi Bani Khalid, Oman. A woman leads water buffaloes, canoeing through the UNESCO-listed Chabaish Marshes in Nasiriyah, Iraq. Old Damascus, Syria. The oldest building in Amman, Jordan. The heritage village of Ushaiger, Saudi Arabia. Palestinian teenagers playing on a steep fence above the West Bank. An elegant room in a 200 year old house converted into a hotel in Kfour, Lebanon. A window on Ghadames, Libya.

The idea of ​​representation arose from Camel’s own experience as the daughter of Egyptian immigrant parents. Born and raised in the United States, she has spent summers in Egypt where she says she has “a taste of both worlds” and “the gap” between the two. She grew up in environments that didn’t know where Egypt was, let alone what language was spoken there, and it was alienating. During her visit to Egypt, she also saw the awe-inspiring people associated with those “from the west”.

“I know we have a lot of good things, but I want to give them a sense of value. We also have something beautiful to offer to the world, through our history, our art and our culture. Camel started the Instagram account after spending eight months in Egypt for the first time as a freelance adult. “I was able to travel and saw things that I had never seen before, opening my eyes to the beauty, history and culture of the region, which the western world did not know. ‘opportunity to see. ”

In 2017, she was involved in humanitarian work in Europe’s largest refugee camp, Moria, on the Greek island of Lesvos, where she found herself with displaced people seeking safety and better housing. “I really saw myself and my own family in this situation. It could have been us.

In Moria – the “open air prison” as Human Rights Watch calls it, which was inundated with refugees of 60 nationalities – Camel met an Amazigh person for the first time in his life. “I didn’t know they existed, and when I did, I realized there were some native groups that I didn’t even know about.”

A self-educating journey ensues as she sets up Kheir, sharing images that speak to her, from an awareness influenced by her experience with refugees, among others. “Obviously everyone wants to go to Europe and experience ‘cool western life’ when there is so much beauty here. When I show these places, it comes from a sense of pride, a desire to represent who we really are, not just what we’re known for because of the political headlines.

The sentiment also resonates with her experience as a minority American citizen. Growing up in a private school largely among white American children, Camel says she couldn’t fit in no matter how hard she tried. “At one point you realize that it just doesn’t work, and then you start to relate more to people of color who come from similar backgrounds.” It is in this community that a sense of pride in where it comes from and in whom it is developed has developed. It was different from the generation of his parents who were just trying to survive, have a career and fit in, so their kids could have an opportunity.

Camel assumes that the internet and being connected has helped validate this sense of pride among a community of like-minded people and reconcile them with their identities.

A recent poll of his audience showed that 60 to 70 percent were diasporas from the Middle East and North Africa. While Kheir primarily caters to Western eyes, Camel says she is aware of her audience of Arabs located in the area. It is not lost on her that her US passport gives her the freedom of movement to travel in the MENA region without restriction, a privilege denied to Arabs themselves.

But while postcolonial borders are difficult to cross as travel policies are designed to distrust or discourage intra-Arab tourism, there is little demand for the company anyway. A 2016 list of the ten most popular travel destinations for Arabs released by the World Tourism Organization included just one Arab city: Dubai. Formerly a medical student, Camel is now involved in her family’s Air B & Bs and produces photography focused on travel, art and architecture. She was due to transform Kheir into a travel guide and cultural blog this week, highlighting the artists.

“Travel is tough, but I also think when you’re a woman it’s a whole different experience,” she says. “So I would also like to capture some of these experiences through the eyes of a woman. A traveler is absolutely not represented and it is a bit risky and sometimes scary.

* A print version of this article appears in the September 2, 2021 edition of Al-Ahram Weekly

Short link:


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