amazigh berber – Liby Amazigh http://libyamazigh.org/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 09:40:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://libyamazigh.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-1-32x32.png amazigh berber – Liby Amazigh http://libyamazigh.org/ 32 32 Escalating Conflict in Kabylie (Part 1 of 2) https://libyamazigh.org/escalating-conflict-in-kabylie-part-1-of-2/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 09:40:38 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/escalating-conflict-in-kabylie-part-1-of-2/

**This is the first of a two-part series covering the Kabyle-Algerian conflict. The second part will deal with specific allegations of genocide by the Kabyle government in exile against the Algerian state and the petitions it has filed with two tribunals.

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While wildfires occur almost every year in Algeria in the northeast region of Tizi Ouzou in the Kabylie region, last August they ravaged the once verdant region, destroying hundreds of thousands of hectares, incinerating thousands of homes and killing at least 90 people. . The disaster has provoked cross accusations and allegations from the recently installed Algerian government – which has little popular support – and the exiled government of Kabylia – which represents the Amazigh (Berber) population known as Kabyles.

The current situation – with little or no media coverage – is the culmination of events dating back decades, to Algeria’s independence from France in the 1960s and the emergence of the Kabyle independence movement.

Independence of Kabylie and Hirak movements

President Abdelmajid Tebboune is the successor to the corrupt 20-year reign of former President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who died on September 17, 2021 at the age of 84. Bouteflika had been in poor health since 2013 and his term ended in disgrace. in 2019. His long-awaited retirement was precipitated by massive popular protests by the pro-democracy Hirak movement that year.

Hailing from the Kabylie region, the Hirak sought to overhaul the entire system of Algerian government, in place since the North African country’s independence from France in 1962. Although often compared in the Arab Spring that started with Tunisia in 2011, the Algerian Hirak “spring” did not turn into summer and Tebboune took office on December 19, 2019. He won with 58% of the vote in an election with less than 40% voter turnout.

Almost three months later, in March 2020, Tebboune banned all “marches and gatherings, whatever their motives”, ostensibly to protect the population from the Covid-19 pandemic. But many saw it as a pretext that was used to restrict all freedom of expression, assembly and opposition to the regime.

In March 2020, Tebboune banned all “marches and gatherings, whatever their motives”.

Nevertheless, protests by the Hirak movement returned to the streets in February 2021, and have continued throughout the year despite hundreds of arrests, including a 14-year-old girl who was arrested in December and then sent back to judgment for “attending an unarmed meeting”. gathering.'”

Human Rights Watch (HRW) has released its 2021 World Report documenting a litany of human rights violations in 2020 by the Algerian state against journalists, doctors and women.

The Kabyle independence movement (not mentioned in the HRW report) has championed the independence aspirations of the Kabyle people since the 1980s. The Kabyles constitute the largest homogeneous cultural-linguistic-ethnic Amazigh community in Algeria. They are estimated to constitute around 40% of the Algerian population, although the exact figures are disputed. Their homeland, Kabylie, is the mountainous region of northern Algeria, just 100 kilometers east of the country’s capital, Algiers, which stretches along the Mediterranean coast.

The Kabyles have perhaps been the indigenous Amazigh people of North Africa (from Morocco to Egypt) who have most spoken out in opposition to the “Arabization” of their homeland and culture. While other countries like Morocco have taken steps to recognize the rights and acknowledge the cultural renaissance of their indigenous Amazigh population, Algerian regimes have seen this as a challenge to their legitimacy. It was not until 2002 that the Kabyle language (dialect of Tamazight) was made a “national language” by the Algerian Constitution. However, it only became an “official” language, alongside Arabic, in 2016.

Algerian government cracks down with arrests and disappearances

In May 2021, the Algerian government declared The Movement for the Self-Determination of Kabylia (MAK) a terrorist organization and issued an international arrest warrant against the President of the Kabyle Provisional Government in exile, Ferhat Mehenni, who resides in Paris.

The Algerian government accused the Kabyle independence movement of deliberately starting the fires.

A few months later, in August 2021, while offering no evidence to support this claim, the Algerian government accused the Kabyle independence movement of deliberately starting the fires. He then launched a new wave of arrests and detentions, including 27 suspected MAK members after an attack in two northern towns.

Algerian police kidnapped, disappeared and detained activist Kamira Naït Sid, co-president of the Amazigh World Congress, an international NGO that defends the rights of the Amazigh people. Her family learned a few days later that she had been arrested on or around August 28.

On September 12, police officers from Tizi Ouzou arrested Mohamed Mouloudj, a reporter for the local independent newspaper Freedom, and raided his home, according to a statement from his employer and dispatches. Two days later, an Algiers court charged him with spreading false news, undermining national unity and belonging to a terrorist group. Since then, he has been detained, pending an investigation.

[Algerian Hirak Makes Comeback Despite Government Maneuvers]

The MAK against the “propaganda machine” of Algiers

In response to the Algerian government’s allegations, Mehenni called two press conferences, on August 31 and September 24, 2021 in Paris. At first, he claimed that the Algerian government was attempting genocide by burning large swaths of its people’s homeland, Kabylia. He also condemned the Algerian government for setting the fires in an attempt to stifle the independence movement.

He recited a long litany of accusations, including:

“I accuse Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune of threatening my life.

I accuse the Algerian regime of torture and crimes against humanity.

I accuse the government and the army of burning Kabylia and refusing to put out the fire and block international aid.

“I accuse the Algerian regime of torture and crimes against humanity.”

He accused “Algeria of lying about all these things”, and the government’s strategy to “demonize the Kabyle people” and “influence international public opinion to think that the MAK was behind the fires”.

Mehenni also condemned the brutal lynching and burning of the body of Djamel Ben Ismail, 37, a young activist who had traveled to the Kabylia region to help put out the fires. The savage murder happened in the presence of the police who did almost nothing to stop the assault. Mehenni said the assassination was filmed on cellphones and shared on social media and was so gruesome that it “can never be invisible”.

“I feel moved in my flesh and in my soul by the Algerian propaganda machine,” he concluded. Regarding his arrest warrant, Mehenni said, “I hope France will refuse to extradite an innocent person.”

Arrest of Kamira Naït Sid, co-president of the World Amazigh Congress

Asked by Inside Arabia during the press conference on what had happened to Kamira Naït Sid and on the veracity of the reports that she had been tortured, Mehenni declared that she had been kidnapped “without witnesses and without any legal procedure”. He said it’s been ‘almost a week, and we still don’t have an account of the charges against the woman who is the president of an NGO… At the moment there is complete opacity about her whereabouts. and on the PDA charges”. He added that “the lawyers will have to meet her to find out if she was tortured”.

Human rights organization Front Line Defenders (FLD) later confirmed that Naït Sid was abducted by Algerian security forces from her home in Draa-Ben-Khedda, near Tizi Ouzou. She had been reported missing by her family for eight days before security services finally confirmed she was in custody in Algiers.

Naït Sid had been abducted by Algerian security forces from her home in Draa-Ben-Khedda.

Naït Sid was brought before an investigating judge at the Sidi M’hamed court in Algiers on September 1 on eight counts, including “undermining national unity and state security” and “belonging to a terrorist organization”. She faces ten years to life in prison and/or the death penalty.

Her sister, women’s rights defender Zina Naït Sid, was also arrested by security forces without a warrant on August 29, 2021 but was released the next day without being charged.

FLD published on its website that Naït Sid is “targeted for her legitimate and peaceful work in defense of human rights”.

The Association of Mountain Populations of the World (APMM) based in Paris [Association of World Mountain Populations] released a statement on November 27, saying the terrorism charge against Naït Sid is “totally far-fetched and not based on any credible factual basis.” He claimed she was being arbitrarily detained “in violation of international standards” and strongly denounced her “wrongful incarceration”.

The accusation of terrorism against Naït Sid is “completely far-fetched and not based on any credible factual element”.

Lounès Belkacem, the secretary general of the CMA, declared Inside Arabia that in terrorism cases, Algerian law provides for “a four-month pre-trial detention, renewable five times, but it is up to the judge to decide whether or not to extend the pre-trial detention”. He added that for the purposes of the UN and the African Commission on Human Rights, Nait Sid’s status is that of “prisoner in arbitrary detention”.

Inside Arabia reached one of her lawyers, Maître Allik, who confirmed that she had been in pre-trial detention for more than four months, without having been heard by the investigating judge until now. The main charge against her, he said, is “belonging to a terrorist organization”, although she “does not share the ideas of the MAK”.

He added that Nait Sid’s imprisonment is a violation of human rights because of “political conditions in Algeria”, in complete disregard of his affiliation with a non-governmental organization.

Allik, who is in Algiers, did not confirm reports of torture. However, according to Aksel Meziane, spokesperson for the government in exile, “torture has become a common practice in Algerian police stations, barracks and prisons”.

The MAK seized the International Criminal Court

During MAK’s second press conference held on September 24, 2021, the group announced that it had filed a human rights complaint before the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague against the Algerian government, alleging the ” genocide” of the Kabyle people.

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Two sides of the same coin https://libyamazigh.org/two-sides-of-the-same-coin/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 18:54:28 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/two-sides-of-the-same-coin/

Anyone who pays attention to the Arab-Israeli conflict over the past 20 years knows how those who regularly do propaganda on behalf of the Palestinian Arab cause try to hijack any cause or crisis in the world and turn it into a matter of Israel and the Palestinians. Given this bent, that so many notorious critics of Israel, from Shaun King to Rashida Tlaib to Huwaida Arraf, have tried to claim that Ukrainians fighting the Russian invasion are the same as Hamas terrorists and of Fatah who attempt to assassinate Israelis is not surprising.

But since before Russia invaded Ukraine, no Ukrainian militia has been indiscriminately firing thousands of rockets into Russia targeting Russian civilians. And no Ukrainian leader was claiming that Russia had no right to exist, falsely claiming that Russians had no history in Russia, or inciting their people to kill random Russians, while offering Ukrainians pay-to-kill incentive allowances that paid them eight times over. what an average teacher in Ukraine earns if he murders Russians. Most people understand that these false comparisons are specious.

What is surprising, however, is how few people understand the close connection between ideology and the history of Russification, which drives Putin’s and Russia’s latest efforts to conquer and colonize Ukraine. , and the ideology and history of Arabization, which animated, for more than a century, the continued violent rejection of Jewish nationality and sovereignty in the Middle East.

In Putin’s February 21 speech in which he announced Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, he said:

“I would like to emphasize again that Ukraine is not just a neighboring country for us. It is an inalienable part of our own history, culture and spiritual space. The first is really the main one: why was it necessary to appease the nationalists, to satisfy the ever-growing nationalist ambitions on the periphery of the old empire? What is the use of transferring to new administrative units, often arbitrarily formed, the federated republics, vast territories which have nothing to do with them? Let me repeat that these territories were transferred with the population of what was historically Russia.

Putin had previously made similar ahistorical statements about Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, saying they too had no business as independent countries because they were really just part of the greater Russian nation.

But the Russification of these separate nations and peoples began much earlier in Russian history and dates back to the 1500s.

Most people in Ukraine and the Baltic States speak Russian. They do this because it was the state language of the Soviet Union, imposed everywhere and imposed on these countries during a massive Russification campaign during Soviet times. But the Russification of these separate nations and peoples began much earlier in Russian history and dates back to the 1500s. And it became an official part of the imperialist policy of the Russian Empire under Tsar Alexander III in the 1880s. What unofficial and official Russification meant in practice was the forced use of the Russian language as well as the suppression of all other nationalities and cultures.

It is this policy of Russification, under the Tsars and Soviet dictators like Stalin, which aimed to destroy all aspects of the distinct cultural, linguistic and national identities of the peoples and nations that the Russians conquered, including in Ukraine. This is why in a March 3, 2022 meeting with the Russian Security Council, Putin said, “I will never give up my belief that Russians and Ukrainians are one nation. Putin intended this statement as a vindication of Russian imperialism and to once again turn Ukraine into a vassal state of Russia without any regard for the Ukrainian people’s right to sovereignty and self-determination.

Similarly, the Arabization, including of Judea/Palestine, which began in the 7th century, was also implemented to destroy the distinct ethnic identities, languages ​​and cultures of the various tribes and peoples conquered during the imperial conquests of the Arab Empire across the Middle East. and North Africa (MENA).

Arabization has been such a powerful force behind almost complete Arab hegemony and control of the MENA region that until 2014 it was illegal in relatively moderate Morocco for parents to simply give their children non-Arabic names. , even though Morocco was originally Amazigh (Berber) for centuries before the Arab conquest of North Africa and a large percentage of its population to this day (despite centuries of institutional and systemic Arabization) still identifies as Amazigh.

And while Putin has repeatedly expressed over the past two weeks the Russian imperialist and eliminationist idea that Ukraine has no legitimacy as an independent country, this same mantra has been repeatedly preached by Arab supremacists in part of movements for greater sovereignty, independence or even equality in parts of their indigenous lands by Kurds, Copts, Amazighs and Jews.

It is clear that the history of Russification and Soviet control of Ukraine profoundly influenced Putin’s view of Ukraine, so he admits “will never give up his belief” that Ukraine will not nothing to do as an independent country. Likewise, Arab dictators and theocrats, since the beginning of Jewish independence and the indigenous rights movement (Zionism) gaining momentum in the 20th century, have been adamant – because of the history of Arabization and systemic Islamization in the MENA region – that the Jewish people have no right to an independent country, and that any such country, no matter how small, is illegitimate and must be destroyed.

With regard to Jewish independence and sovereignty in the indigenous, historical and religious homeland of the Jewish people, statements remarkably similar to Putin’s belief (on the alleged illegitimacy of Ukrainian independence) can be found in the Article 15 of the Hamas Charter and Article 20 of the PLO Charter.

While Article 15 of the Hamas Charter focuses on the idea that once the land has become (by conquest) “Islamic lands”, it can never go back (“[w]When our enemies usurp certain Islamic lands, Jihad becomes a binding duty of all Muslims”), Article 20 of the PLO Charter (also known as the Palestinian National Covenant) expressly denies the people Jew his free will, his status as a people and his legitimacy as a nation. .

Thus, it is abundantly clear that it is not just false claims about “genocide” and false claims about who the “Nazis” are that Israel haters have in common with Putin. It is also the denial of distinct identities for those who have been subjected for centuries to imperialist campaigns to destroy them – those who, despite Russification and Arabization, have retained their unique identities, languages ​​and cultures, who worked, fought and won their respective rights. sovereign and independent states. Putin and those who hate Israel are convinced that these states have no right to exist and wish to eliminate them.

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“Nightmare” of underage marriage for Moroccan girls https://libyamazigh.org/nightmare-of-underage-marriage-for-moroccan-girls/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 06:49:15 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/nightmare-of-underage-marriage-for-moroccan-girls/

Nadia was just 16 when she was married off to an abusive husband old enough to be her father – an ordeal that thousands of Moroccan girls face each year due to a legal loophole.

“I’ve been through hell. But the nightmare is behind me now,” she said.

Nadia, from a remote region in the Anti-Atlas Mountains of the North African kingdom, has managed to get a divorce after a year of marriage.

Now 20 years old and living with her parents in her village of Tamarwoute, she is learning to read and write.

“My dream is to be independent, and I encourage other girls in the village to do the same,” she says shyly, her face half covered with a scarf.

Like the other women with similar stories cited in this article, her name has been changed to protect her identity.

Morocco’s 2004 family code sets the legal age of marriage at 18, but it includes a clause allowing judges to grant families special dispensation to marry off children under that age.

Rights groups have long called for the loophole to be closed.

But according to official figures, judges approved some 13,000 waivers in 2020 alone, more than half of all applications.

This figure does not include minors married in customary marriages, not recognized by law but sealed by a simple reading of a verse from the Koran alongside two witnesses.

Najat Ikhich of rights group YTTO says “this tragedy is widespread in remote, landlocked and marginalized areas”.

For 10 years, the association she leads has made an annual convoy through Morocco’s remote mountain communities, stopping to raise awareness of the dangers of early marriage, organize debates and distribute aid.

Precarious livelihoods and longstanding traditions make the group’s mission particularly sensitive.

“It’s delicate work because it’s a taboo subject, so it’s vital that we gain the trust of the people we meet and above all, that we listen to them,” Ikhich said.

Battle for independence

In the nearby village of Tamadghouste, among the hills dotted with the region’s famous argan trees, hardly a soul moved.

A few young women were gathered to bake bread in the communal oven.

Ikhich approached and exchanged a few words with them in Amazigh, the Berber language of Morocco.

The wary looks of women quickly gave way to a flood of complaints about the standard of living in a village that has no school or pharmacy.

Amina, 23, said she was trying to ‘take control’ of her life, after being taken out of school aged six and married off at 17.

“I always wanted to study but no one helped me. My three sisters had it even worse: they got married very young, around the age of 14,” she said.

In the Souss Massa region, more than 44% of women are illiterate, according to the latest official figures from 2014.

Educating women and making them more economically independent are key to tackling child marriage, said Karima Errejraji, YTTO’s coordinator for southern Morocco.

She had never set foot in a school as a child and was married at the age of 14 to a 56-year-old man, four times her age.

“I got out of it by getting involved in associations,” she says. “I decided to dedicate my life to helping the girls of this region.”

At the communal oven in Tamadghouste, women discuss making carpets or selling traditional bread to nearby hotels as ways to earn a living and gain self-reliance.

They agreed on one thing: all girls have the right to an education.

Izza, a bright-eyed 23-year-old who married six years ago, said she was fighting for her daughter to have an education.

“She must build herself, become independent and avoid finding herself in my situation,” she says.

© Agence France-Presse

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Morocco – well placed to benefit from Europe’s energy transition https://libyamazigh.org/morocco-well-placed-to-benefit-from-europes-energy-transition/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 19:59:56 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/morocco-well-placed-to-benefit-from-europes-energy-transition/

Population: 37.13 million (+1.2% vs 2020)

GDP per capita (PPP): $7,360 (+0.9% compared to 2020)

Debt to GDP: 76.6% (+1.2% vs 2019)

Power per capita: 765 kWh

Reduced fossil fuel subsidies, CSP leader

By the end of 2020, Morocco had 1.4 GW of installed wind, 530 MW of CSP and just 220 MW of solar PV, meaning total solar has only reached a third of its old 2020 target. With hydropower at 1.77 GW and 465 MW of pumped hydropower, the country already has a significant amount of clean energy – 3950 GW out of a total of over 10 GW. The rest of the electricity is mainly coal, dependent on Russian imports, with a small amount of natural gas. A new coal-fired power plant was commissioned in 2021, but the country then promised at COP26 not to build any more.

By 2030, Morocco aims to achieve 20% solar, 20% wind and 12% hydroelectricity in its energy mix, compared to 35% in 2019. Nuclear has been considered with a nuclear training center created in March 2021, and maybe there will indeed eventually be a nuclear power plant using SMR or some other modern technology. The country has room for at least several gigawatts of additional hydropower.

Surprisingly for a desert country, wind is still envisioned to be built as much as solar – and a look at a wind speed map shows you why. The southwest coast has almost the same wind speeds as the North Sea – but it has them on land. It is an exceptional resource that helps explain the reassertion of the Moroccan occupation of Western Sahara – more on that later.

Morocco’s NDC under the Paris Climate Agreement was updated last June with a 45.5% reduction in emissions by 2030, 60% of which depends on foreign aid. The phosphate industry – for which Morocco has three-quarters of the world’s reserves and the third largest production – has gained particular recognition as an emissions reduction target.

So far, Morocco’s most unusual achievement in the energy transition is its CSP networks – 530 MW, or 8% of the world’s total CSP. He was also a pioneer in North Africa as the first to reduce fossil fuel subsidies. Morocco has only set up a national oil and gas projects division of the National Office of Hydrocarbons and Mines (ONHYM) a few months ago, in November. If a large and suitable offshore gas field is discovered, you could see Western oil majors investing in new gas development in the country, but at this point in history, the “end of the beginning” of the energy transition, that seems unlikely. outside. Even the existing gas trade between Nigeria and Europe via pipeline died out after the failed renewal of the transit agreement with Algeria.

A not-quite-stagnant economy

In terms of wealth per capita, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and even Libya are surprisingly close to each other – but Morocco does so without Algeria’s fossil fuels – the country imports 91% of its gas and 99% of its oil – and with an HDI ranking. 45% of the population is employed in the agricultural sector once forestry and fishing are included and the sector accounts for 15% of GDP. You might think that Morocco doesn’t have the best agricultural land and you would be right. Agriculture is an investment that does not pay off quickly, any more than the fight against rebels in the Sahara, which has cost the country tens of billions over the past half century.

With a low-skilled workforce, manufacturing is also limited to lower-value propositions, and according to some reports, education levels may even drop. Currently, literacy is on par with Tunisia and Algeria at 79%, but the Arabization language policy and other factors have resulted in poor performance of Moroccan schools. Arabization aimed to sideline the Amazigh Berber language, a policy that was reversed by the new prime minister. But what Moroccans need most is to be able to speak English for business and work, a language that was only mandated to be taught in schools in 2002. European languages ​​left behind legacy of colonial times are the Spanish and French and the Amazigh-Arab dispute. is also a distraction. France is an important trading partner but that doesn’t go any further.

All in all, you have a poor country that still only has a growth rate of between 2% and 4% in most years, with its main sectors like tourism, agriculture, textiles and phosphates – all very basic efforts.

The silver lining is car manufacturing, which could account for up to 25% of GDP this year, with local content reaching 60%. The finance and sales destination is Western Europe, but Tesla’s electric vehicle chip manufacturing has also been the subject of noise. This industry and others will be bolstered by Morocco’s high-speed rail infrastructure projects, which could eventually extend to West Africa after recent military successes against rebel forces in the south of the country. Although the country is both poor and has poor institutions at best, it is more open for business than its neighbors and has some potential.

Conflict in Western Sahara reignited by developments

Morocco is a hybrid democracy. Real elections take place, but political parties are tamed by a monarchy that still wields great formal power. As a result, even under the Justice and Development Party (PJD), which is supposed to be Islamist in the style of the Muslim Brotherhood in a context of democracy and monarchy in Morocco, the burqa was banned in 2017 and diplomatic relations were established with Israel last year. . The PJD totally collapsed in the 2021 elections to be replaced by even more secular parties. Fame and clientelism guide the actions of Moroccan politicians more than ideology or vision.

The reconciliation with Israel has been overseen by the United States, with which it is strongly allied, including at the intelligence level, but it is the EU which is of course Morocco’s largest destination for exports and emigrants. . Then there is China – Morocco signed a Belt and Road Implementation Plan just weeks ago, making it the first state in North Africa to pass a protocol. ‘OK.

Morocco’s diplomatic standing is currently weak, feuding with Spain and France and ending official diplomatic contact with Germany, over all their stance on its dominance of Western Sahara. Like Turkey, the country can choose the extent to which it suppresses migration entering Europe through its territory, and its intelligence alliance with the West is also important in suppressing Islamist terrorism. Meanwhile, some politicians in the United States are calling for the revocation of American recognition of Moroccan sovereignty in Western Sahara – this recognition is how President Trump bought Morocco’s recognition of Israel.

The Western Sahara conflict dates back to 1975, but there was a ceasefire in 1991 that was only recently broken by Morocco, which forcibly restored the land route to Mauritania.

Algeria’s support for the Polisario Front, which is the Sahrawi independence movement in Western Sahara, is also one of the main reasons for the bad relations between it and Morocco, while Algeria is unhappy that Morocco is on good terms with Israel and accuses it of supporting the Berber secessionist movement MAK.

At least so far, these quarrels have not hampered existing trade, especially not with Algeria since this border has been closed since 1994 anyway. But Morocco could always use new agreements and more direct investment. foreigners – it usually receives 2 or 3 billion dollars a year, mainly from Western Europe.

Renewables could use a subsidy or auction system

Amusingly, the Polisario Front has accused Morocco of using green energy developments in Western Sahara to legitimize its occupation – this kind of “greenwashing” is new! The Front even produced its own net zero plan, drawn up with the help of some Western intellectuals. It is very likely that the Sahrawi cause still does not receive any substantial help outside of Algeria, and these intellectuals are just idealistic NGO types.

Another possibility worth mentioning for Morocco’s green future is the construction of solar power in North Africa coupled with UHVDC lines transmitting it to Europe. The Morocco-UK power project envisions a 3.6 GW, 3,800 kilometer subsea HVDC line across Devon. This line would cost billions with a power loss of up to 15% in transit, but would still be very attractive – giving Morocco a new export and the UK more capacity to use solar power. CSP’s presence in Morocco could also come into play with energy storage amplifying the ability to use the line consistently, but project developer XLinks seems more interested so far in a 5 GW battery complex and 4 hours accompanying 10.5 GW of solar and wind power.

Along the same lines, the Western Sahara region is perfect for green hydrogen production – excellent land availability, wind and sun, coastal, on the doorstep of Europe. But Morocco only has a 100 MW hydrogen tender scheduled for 2022, just as it has only installed 200 MW of photovoltaics. For wind power alone, Morocco has pledged to mobilize $1.6 billion in global financing for a 1 GW wind power program, which will be commissioned nationwide by 2024.

It is therefore a country in a good position, but it still has to seriously encourage renewable energies or establish a lot of significant short-term ambitions. Most likely, Morocco is still waiting for this foreign aid and the ideas mentioned in its NDC.

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A long battle for acceptance for Morocco’s Amazigh community https://libyamazigh.org/a-long-battle-for-acceptance-for-moroccos-amazigh-community/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 19:16:27 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/a-long-battle-for-acceptance-for-moroccos-amazigh-community/ For decades, Morocco’s Amazigh community has advocated for official recognition of the new year as an official paid holiday, a symbolic recognition of the indigenous identity they hope to gain under the leadership of Amazigh Prime Minister Aziz Akhannouch.

Every year, Morocco’s Amazigh community is on hot coals ahead of Idh Yennayer, the Amazigh New Year, as they hope for a last-minute official recognition of the indigenous holiday as a paid national holiday – a symbolic move the community has advocated for decades.

“The recognition of Idh Yennayer is an essential step for Moroccans to come to terms with their history and cultural identity,” said Abellah Badou, former head of the executive office of the Amazigh Network for Citizenship in Morocco. The New Arab.

“This would help strengthen their sense of belonging to the homeland and strengthen the values ​​of pluralism, cultural diversity and coexistence, especially since the Amazigh community has been marginalized and discriminated against over the past decades,” Badou added.

“The recognition of Idh Yennayer is an essential step for Moroccans to reconcile with their history and their cultural identity”

950 years ahead of the Gregorian calendar, the first day of the Amazigh calendar falls on January 13 each year. Other Amazigh communities in Tunisia, Algeria, Libya and Egypt begin Yennayer celebrations on January 12.

Historians are also divided on the origin of Idh Yennayer between those who believe that the choice of January 13 symbolizes the celebration of land and agriculture, and those who say the day is a commemoration of the Berber king Chachnak on Egyptian pharaoh Ramses II.

A beautiful diverse party

Each year in Morocco, the various Amazigh tribes – numbering more than eight million people out of the country’s 36.9 inhabitants – celebrate the indigenous year with traditional meals and folk music.

“I remember helping my family make couscous and then going to my grandmother’s house to celebrate Yennayer at night while showing off our colorful traditional scarves and dance moves,” said Fadma, 50, who left her Berber village near Agadir to live in the city of Kenitra, where she tries to preserve her identity by partying with her daughters.

“Idh JYnnayer”, “Idh Skas” or “Hakouzah”, the names differ according to the regions and the plates too, which can include the dish “Orkemen”, the porridge “Takla”, “Imshikhen” or “couscous with seven vegetables” – each region has its own preferences.

In the Souss region, for example, the natives celebrate the day with Tagoulla, a kind of mash made from barley or corn, served with a mixture of honey and Argan oil or butter. The plate has become a “taste identity” of the day.

Imazighen (Berbers) wearing traditional clothes celebrate the New Year according to the Imazighen calendar in Tizi Ouzou, Algeria on January 12, 2021

“When I was young, we used to put agormi (date kernels) inside takla porridge before serving it to family members, because it is believed that whoever finds the kernels in eating the hot dish will be the luckiest person in the next year. , Fadma said laughing while stirring the couscous broth.

Tastes, rhythms and dance moves vary between Rif, Sous and Ishelhien but the concept of celebration is the same, commemorating land and identity.

“But we must not forget that Idh Yennayer is more than Tagoulla and folklore – it is a celebration of land, citizens and memory as essential components of multiple national identities and different regions without any exclusions”, said said Amazigh activist Badou.

No more broken promises of recognition

In this Amazigh year 2972, the indigenous community of Morocco had higher hopes of finally obtaining the longed-for recognition after the appointment of the Amazigh politician Aziz Akhannouch as head of the country’s government, following the massive victory of his party the National Rally of Independents (RNI). in the September 8 elections.

Born in a small Moroccan Berber town near Agadir, the 61-year-old businessman built his political identity and his party’s electoral platform on representing the concerns and problems of the Amazigh community, winning the approval indigenous people in the country’s last elections.

Members of the Moroccan Amazigh Berber community sing as they celebrate the Amazigh New Year’s Eve near the parliament in the Moroccan capital, Rabat [Getty Images]

Once in power, the party has repeatedly echoed demands from the indigenous community to recognize Amazigh heritage, language and celebrations, but has so far failed to deliver on its promises.

The long-awaited real-time Amazigh translation during the parliamentary session was suspended, while government spokesman Mustapha Baitass dodged questions from journalists about the lack of official recognition of the Amazigh New Year that the RNI had been promising for a decade .

The country’s former cabinet, led by the Islamist party, the Justice and Development Party, has repeatedly said that recognition of Idh Ynnayer belongs to Morocco’s King Mohammed VI.

The biggest victory for Morocco’s indigenous peoples in their decades-long struggle was the recognition of Tamazight – the indigenous Amazigh language – as the country’s official language, following the 2011 constitution.

Released by the palace, the constitution has stifled the Arab Spring protests that have taken the country by storm, with young protesters waving the Moroccan flag alongside the Amazigh flag in massive demonstrations.

“The weak policy of establishing Tamazight as an official language reveals to us that we are facing a great collective “maneuver”, in which all political parties, without exception, have participated to varying degrees, to absorb the anger of the street. Moroccan in February 2011,” added Amazigh activist Badou.

Despite the recognition of the Amazigh language a decade ago, Tamazight is still limited to official signs of public administrations and institutions, while administrative formalities, the media and school curricula are still largely dominated by the French. since the years of colonization.

Nevertheless, with the new year comes new hope, and as the Amazigh community celebrates Yennayer, their struggle for recognition in Morocco persists.

Basma El Atti is New Arab’s correspondent in Morocco

Follow her on Twitter: @elattibasma

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The making of President Dbeibah | Habib Lassoued https://libyamazigh.org/the-making-of-president-dbeibah-habib-lassoued/ https://libyamazigh.org/the-making-of-president-dbeibah-habib-lassoued/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 10:32:17 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/the-making-of-president-dbeibah-habib-lassoued/

In recent months, Abdulhamid Dbeibah has become the center of a well-oiled operation aimed at shaping his image as a popular leader. Libyan and foreign specialists participated in the exercise, which was managed by a central operating room in Turkey working with public relations firms in the United States and the United Kingdom. Huge contracts would have been signed and teams mobilized to restore the image of Dbeibah and present him to the people as the man of the future.

There is a determination to ensure that Dbeibah and his team remain at the helm of the rich country for at least another decade. There are even those who speak of absolute control of the country by a government that will remain in the hands of a specific region and a particular group of the population.

This means that Dbeibah’s accession to the post of Prime Minister was not a coincidence and that the spending of at least $ 20 million to buy votes in the sessions of the Political Dialogue Forum in Tunis and Geneva was not was not an act of random bribery. It was just as calculated as the dismissal of the results of the international investigation into corruption charges at the Political Dialogue Forum. With wealth and money, the doors open on their own. The international community in the final analysis is not a charitable organization working for the general good on one side or the other. Decision makers are not angels. They are human beings who have interests in and have ties to transnational corporations, including oil and gas companies and construction companies. Senior Western officials are not immune to corruption, which they practice outside their country. They get big privileges, gifts and offers. Moreover, Libya is a wealthy country and it is currently ruled by a successful businessman who has surrounded himself with a team of rich people, traders, traders and credit barons. The governor of the Central Bank is part of the picture. Its role is actually indicative of the nature of the current scene.

Anyone who follows the course of events will realize that Dbeibah followed a plan that was meticulously prepared by regional and international actors. They sought to consolidate a political leadership based on hostility towards the leaders of the Libyan National Army (LNA), the marginalization of Cyrenaica and Fezzan, by keeping aloof from the Council of the presidency, by welcoming militias and mercenaries and by striving to gain popular support by promising the public that it will benefit from the immense wealth of the country, a dream cherished by Libyans for many decades.

The international community has allowed Dbeibah to take advantage of his political position and executive authority. The governor of the Central Bank has been asked to accompany the Prime Minister in all his requests. What matters in the end is how to successfully present Dbeibah as the face of the future with the traits of a liberal and democratic businessman who goes with his time and is ready to make transactional deals.

It is only natural that conspiracy theorists are followed. Forces supporting Dbeibah have reportedly called on the United Nations to intervene to ensure the adoption of the amendments proposed by the Independent National High Electoral Commission to the law on presidential elections promulgated by the House of Representatives on September 9. The UN mission clearly called for the removal of “restrictions on participation in elections to allow Libyans in public office to suspend their official activities from the moment they apply for the presidency, as proposed by the High National Electoral Commission. . “

The issue here relates to Article 12 of the Law on Presidential Elections promulgated by the House of Representatives. This stipulates that “all citizens, whether civilian or military, are deemed to have ceased to work and exercise their functions (for three months before the date of the elections); and if he is not elected, he will return to his previous post.

The first to react was Marshal Khalifa Haftar when he decided on September 22 to devote himself to the presidential election by temporarily ceding his duties as Commander-in-Chief of the LNA to Chief of Staff Abdulrazak al-Nazhuri.

Libyan Prime Minister Abdulhamid Dbeibah arrives at Martyrs Square in the capital Tripoli to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2011 revolution on February 17, 2021 (AFP)

And because the international community insisted on holding the elections on time, contrary to what some parties were striving to achieve, it was suggested that the Election Commission amend this article to state that “every citizen, be it civilian or military, is deemed to have ceased to work and exercise his functions (on the date of the announcement by the Commission of the start of the electoral process) ”.

This means that potential candidates can stop working on the day they apply, as long as the position they held is managed by their assistants who can continue to promote their reputation and ensure that they are in the right position for the job. to be the most prominent candidate for the post of head of state.

Libya now faces two main options. Either change the law and allow Dbeibah to run in the presidential elections, or postpone the elections to allow him to prepare for the poll and relinquish his post three months before the new date.

The objective is therefore to allow Dbeibah to run for the presidency and to be the next president of Libya and thus to cut the grass from under the feet of Haftar, Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, Fathi Bashagha and all the other controversial personalities. that are supposed to work.

He is undoubtedly capable of this after the tremendous work accomplished by the loyal press and public relations agencies made up of the most eminent specialists in the image industry and also by taking advantage of his position as Prime Minister to allow money to be spent. colossal for many social groups.

Dbeibah also tried from the beginning to take advantage of regional and tribal sensitivities, starting from the calculation that Tripoli is the largest demographic base and electoral reservoir and that the voices of Misrata, Tripoli, Zawiya, Amazigh (Berber) areas and a few other areas are sufficient to give him the lead.

It is natural that the international community finds itself among the accused, as it has practiced all forms of lies, hypocrisy and deception regarding the Libyan crisis since its outbreak in February.

He always leads with the same approach and when Dbeibah spoke a few days ago about his country’s frozen funds abroad, he knew what he was saying. He hinted that in the next step, each party will receive the reward it deserves.

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Two Algerian ministries end use of French in official correspondence – Middle East Monitor https://libyamazigh.org/two-algerian-ministries-end-use-of-french-in-official-correspondence-middle-east-monitor/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/two-algerian-ministries-end-use-of-french-in-official-correspondence-middle-east-monitor/

Two Algerian ministries have decided to end their use of the French language in official correspondence in light of growing tensions between Algiers and Paris, Anadolu News Agency reports.

On Thursday, the Algerian Ministry of Vocational Training issued a circular on behalf of the minister, Yassin Merapi, asking staff to use the Arabic language in their official correspondence.

“I attach the utmost importance to the strict application of this circular,” added Merapi.

Likewise, the Minister of Youth and Sports, Abdel Razzaq Sabbak, also ordered the use of Arabic in the internal correspondence of the ministry from November.

READ: France calls on Algeria to respect its sovereignty, following statements by the Algerian ambassador

With the exception of the Ministry of Defense, all Algerian ministries use French in their correspondence and statements, although the country’s Constitution states that Arabic is the first national and official language, followed by Amazigh / Berber.

The decisions of the two ministries were taken in light of the current crisis between Algeria and France, following comments by French President Emmanuel Macron, considered by many Algerians to be insulting.

Algeria responded by recalling its ambassador to Paris and banning French military planes from using Algerian airspace on October 3.

Last week, French President Emmanuel Macron accused Algerian authorities of stoking hatred against France.

The use of French spread in Algeria during 132 years of colonial rule by France between 1830 and 1962.

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Two Algerian ministries stop the use of French in official relations https://libyamazigh.org/two-algerian-ministries-stop-the-use-of-french-in-official-relations/ Fri, 22 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/two-algerian-ministries-stop-the-use-of-french-in-official-relations/

Quick news

Amid mounting tensions with France, Algerian ministries are asking staff to use the Arabic language in official correspondence.

People hold a sign and Algerian flags during a rally to commemorate the brutal crackdown on an October 17, 1961 demonstration near the Pont Neuf on October 17, 2021 in Paris. (AFP)

Two Algerian ministries have decided to end their use of the French language in official correspondence in view of the growing tensions between Algiers and Paris.

On Thursday, the Algerian Ministry of Vocational Training issued a circular on behalf of Minister Yassin Merapi, asking staff to use the Arabic language in their official correspondence.

“I attach the utmost importance to the strict application of this circular,” added Merapi.

Likewise, the Minister of Youth and Sports Abdel Razzaq Sabbak also ordered the use of Arabic in the internal correspondence of the ministry from November.

With the exception of the Ministry of Defense, all Algerian ministries use French in their correspondence and statements, although the country’s constitution states that Arabic is the first national and official language, followed by Amazigh / Berber.

Over 130 years of colonial rule

The decisions of the two ministries were taken in light of the current crisis between Algeria and France following the words of French President Emmanuel Macron which were considered by many Algerians as insulting.

Algeria responded by recalling its ambassador to Paris and banning French military planes from using Algerian airspace on October 3.

Last week, French President Emmanuel Macron accused the Algerian authorities of stoking hatred against France.

The use of French spread in Algeria during 132 years of colonial rule by France between 1830 and 1962.

READ MORE: France remembers the massacre in Algeria 60 years later

Source: AA

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Security forces foil separatists in Algeria https://libyamazigh.org/security-forces-foil-separatists-in-algeria/ https://libyamazigh.org/security-forces-foil-separatists-in-algeria/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 08:38:00 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/security-forces-foil-separatists-in-algeria/

Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune (File photo: Xinhua)

Algerian security services said on Wednesday it had foiled armed attacks planned by a separatist group with foreign aid, local media reported.

The DGSN security agency said police this week severed a network linked to the Movement for the Autonomy of Kabylia (MAK), a group that claims independence for the troubled region of Kabylia and that the Algeria considers it a “terrorist” organization, according to a statement released by local media.

According to the statement, 17 people were arrested in north-eastern Kabylia, accused of having planned “armed acts aimed at harming the security of the country, with the complicity of national parties advocating separatism”.

The suspects admitted to having been “in constant contact via the Internet with foreign parties operating under the guise of associations and civil society organizations” based in Israel and a country in North Africa, according to the statement. He did not identify which North African country was allegedly involved, but Algeria accused its regional rival, Morocco, of supporting the separatist MAK and in August severed ties with the kingdom, accusing it of ‘”hostile actions”.

The move came after Morocco’s envoy to the United Nations in July expressed support for self-determination in Kabylia, a stronghold of the Amazigh (Berber) minority.

Algiers firmly opposes any desire for independence in the region. Long-strained relations between Algeria and Morocco have deteriorated in recent times as conflict in the disputed Western Sahara erupted in 2020 after a long ceasefire.

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Algeria accuses Israel of helping plan separatist attack https://libyamazigh.org/algeria-accuses-israel-of-helping-plan-separatist-attack/ https://libyamazigh.org/algeria-accuses-israel-of-helping-plan-separatist-attack/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 08:08:40 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/algeria-accuses-israel-of-helping-plan-separatist-attack/

Algerian security services said on Wednesday they had foiled armed attacks planned by a separatist group receiving foreign aid – including from Israel – local media reported.

The DGSN security agency said police this week severed a network linked to the Movement for the Autonomy of Kabylia (MAK), a group that claims independence for the troubled region of Kabylia and that the Algeria considers it a “terrorist” organization, according to a statement released by local media.

According to Reuters, Algerian channel Ennahar TV said the attack was planned by separatists aided by the “Zionist entity” as well as by a country in North Africa. The second country has not been named, but Algeria has previously accused the MAK of being backed by Israel and its neighbor Morocco.

The security agency’s statement indicates that 17 people were arrested in northeastern Kabylia, accused of having planned “armed acts aimed at harming the security of the country, with the complicity of national parties advocating separatism”.

The suspects admitted to having been “in constant contact via the Internet with foreign parties operating under the guise of associations and civil society organizations” based in Israel and a country in North Africa, according to the statement.

In August Algeria Algeria has cut ties with Morocco, accusing it of “hostile actions”.

The move came after Morocco’s envoy to the United Nations in July expressed support for self-determination in Kabylia, a stronghold of the Amazigh (Berber) minority. Algiers firmly opposes any aspirations for independence in the region.

Long-standing relations between Algeria and Morocco have deteriorated in recent times as the conflict in the disputed Western Sahara erupted last year after a lengthy ceasefire.

Morocco considers the former Spanish colony to be an integral part of its kingdom, but Algeria has supported the Polisario Front, a movement seeking independence there.

Morocco’s normalization of diplomatic relations with Israel last year, as a counterpart to the American recognition of Rabat’s sovereignty over Western Sahara, also sparked new tensions with Algeria, a supporter of the Palestinian cause.

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