Liby Amazigh http://libyamazigh.org/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 17:50:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://libyamazigh.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-1-32x32.png Liby Amazigh http://libyamazigh.org/ 32 32 Artists and critics join Riyadh Art Memento exhibition focus groups https://libyamazigh.org/artists-and-critics-join-riyadh-art-memento-exhibition-focus-groups/ https://libyamazigh.org/artists-and-critics-join-riyadh-art-memento-exhibition-focus-groups/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 00:54:48 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/artists-and-critics-join-riyadh-art-memento-exhibition-focus-groups/

PARIS: “Somewhere between silence and words” revives memories of a trip to Algeria made by Florian Gaite, philosopher, art critic and curator of the exhibition which runs until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des Arts Malakoff centers in Paris.

The exhibit “seeks to bring forth the voices and silence that characterize Algeria so well,” Gaité told Arab News in France.

“It is an attentive ear beyond the Mediterranean. Algeria is a country as well known as it is unknown, and whose complexity – social, political and historical – is equivalent to the cultural diversity expressed there.

Gaite said he set up the project before the Hirak movement and the widespread protests in Algeria in early 2019.

“It upset my vision of the Algerian scene, a country that I did not know, and on which I had prejudices and preconceived ideas from an exclusively Western reading,” he added.

“When I arrived in Algeria, I realized that the sensitive and sensory experience felt there was made up of two extremes. On the one hand, it is an extremely talkative country, where several languages ​​are spoken, a kind of linguistic tinkering. The same language is not spoken from city to city or between generations.

“The older generation speaks Amazigh, their children speak French and Arabic, and the younger generation is more Arabic and English oriented. This stratification of languages ​​seemed crazy to me because in Algeria, there is also a lot of silence. It is a country where people whisper, where there is modesty, ”he said.

Gaite said Algeria is a country “marked by many traumas and a form of detention” because the same injuries are not discussed between generations.

“There are two pitfalls that I wanted to avoid: The first is to place myself in Western criticism coming to evoke the Algerian artistic scene, in which I am not specialized. The second consisted in choosing artists as simple mediators to bear witness to the Algerian. artistic scene. In fact, they know their country better than I do and their testimonies are more accurate and authentic.

According to the organizer of the exhibition, colonization, Islamism and state authoritarianism are among the many traumas in contemporary Algerian history.

“These are a series of causes, prohibitions, denials, repressions that hinder speech and often prevent its transcription in the form of a story. The presence of the testimony and documentary function in contemporary Algerian art thus responds to this need to bear witness to the past as well as the present – colonization, the war of liberation, socialism, the black decade, the Bouteflika era, the Hirak – and to propose rewritings, to unearth what has been erased or falsified, to give a voice to all that is forgotten, ”he declared.

“Somewhere between silence and words” brings together artists born, living or working in Algeria, including Louisa Babari, Adel Bentounsi, Walid Bouchouchi, Fatima Chafaa, Dalila Dalleas Bouzar, Mounir Gouri, Fatima Idiri, Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, Amina Menia and Sadek Rahim.

These Algerian or Franco-Algerian artists were selected by Gaité, who specifies that some are still poorly represented in French galleries.

“This exhibition, which includes more women than men, presents works made with various materials such as paper, charcoal or even fabric.

While in Oran, birthplace of Gaité’s grandmother, the curator met Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, a Franco-Algerian director, who introduced her to her mother, Fatima Idiri.

Born in Aurès, in northeastern Algeria, Idiri lived in Nancy in a family that was part of the resistance networks of the National Liberation Front.

Returning to the country after her independence, she is a self-taught artist – from styling to painting on silk, from mosaic to Berber embroidery – strongly influenced by Impressionism and Orientalism.

“The Hirak’s fervor has been a game-changer,” she said.

By choosing figurative drawing as an artistic identity, she strives to preserve the memory of one of the traditions of her native region, the Aurès, says Gaité.

“By creating his masterpieces from coffee grounds and acrylic, the artist pays homage to the free and liberated poets and singers that are Azriat.

Idiri studies colonial photography and seeks to deconstruct images to rediscover the spontaneity of avant-garde artists frowned upon, even marginalized, during the colonial period.

The exhibition also includes works by Mounir Gouri, winner of the Friends of the IMA (Arab World Institute) prize.

Based in France, Gouri produces moving paintings of “harraga”, or illegal immigrants, turning their journey into a performance.

Gaité highlights a painting of a starry sky, painted in charcoal. “The message that the artist wishes to convey is that when the harraga are in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea in the dark night, the stars are their only source of light.

Works by the visual artist Amina Menia, who lives and works in Algeria, are also on display. His art takes the form of an urban archeology, centered on places and architectural language.

Menia’s works have been exhibited in numerous museums, art centers and galleries, including the Center Pompidou in Paris, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Museum of African Design in Johannesburg, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Marseille and the Royal Hibernian Academy of Dublin.

Works by Sadek Rahim, a multidisciplinary artist who lived in Syria and Jordan, and studied at the Beirut School of Fine Arts, are also presented.

“Somewhere between silence and words” takes place until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des arts de Malakoff, in the Hauts-de-Seine, in Paris.

This story was originally published in French on Arab News in English

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World’s oldest ghost image found on the British Museum’s Babylon Tablet https://libyamazigh.org/worlds-oldest-ghost-image-found-on-the-british-museums-babylon-tablet/ https://libyamazigh.org/worlds-oldest-ghost-image-found-on-the-british-museums-babylon-tablet/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 18:51:39 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/worlds-oldest-ghost-image-found-on-the-british-museums-babylon-tablet/

PARIS: “Somewhere between silence and words” revives memories of a trip to Algeria made by Florian Gaite, philosopher, art critic and curator of the exhibition which runs until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des Arts Malakoff centers in Paris.

The exhibit “seeks to convey the voices and silence that characterize Algeria so well,” Gaité told Arab News in France.

“It is an attentive ear beyond the Mediterranean. Algeria is a country as well known as it is unknown, and whose complexity – social, political and historical – is equivalent to the cultural diversity expressed there.

Gaite said he set up the project before the Hirak movement and the widespread protests in Algeria in early 2019.

“It upset my vision of the Algerian scene, a country that I did not know, and on which I had prejudices and preconceived ideas from an exclusively Western reading,” he added.

“When I arrived in Algeria, I realized that the sensitive and sensory experience felt there was made up of two extremes. On the one hand, it is an extremely talkative country, where several languages ​​are spoken, a kind of linguistic tinkering. The same language is not spoken from city to city or between generations.

“The older generation speaks Amazigh, their children speak French and Arabic, and the younger generation is more Arabic and English oriented. This stratification of languages ​​seemed crazy to me because in Algeria, there is also a lot of silence. It is a country where people whisper, where there is modesty, ”he said.

Gaite said Algeria is a country “marked by many traumas and by a form of detention” because the same injuries are not discussed between generations.

“There are two pitfalls that I wanted to avoid: The first is to place myself as a Western critic coming to evoke the Algerian artistic scene, in which I am not specialized. The second consisted in choosing artists as simple mediators to bear witness to the Algerian. artistic scene. In fact, they know their country better than I do and their testimonies are more accurate and authentic.

According to the organizer of the exhibition, colonization, Islamism and state authoritarianism are among the many traumas in contemporary Algerian history.

“These are a series of causes, prohibitions, denials, repressions that hinder speech and often prevent its transcription in the form of a story. The presence of the testimony and documentary function in contemporary Algerian art thus responds to this need to bear witness to the past as well as the present – colonization, the war of liberation, socialism, the black decade, the Bouteflika era, the Hirak – and to propose rewritings, to exhume what has been erased or falsified, to give a voice to all that is forgotten, ”he declared.

“Somewhere between silence and words” brings together artists born, living or working in Algeria, including Louisa Babari, Adel Bentounsi, Walid Bouchouchi, Fatima Chafaa, Dalila Dalleas Bouzar, Mounir Gouri, Fatima Idiri, Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, Amina Menia and Sadek Rahim.

These Algerian or Franco-Algerian artists were selected by Gaité, who specifies that some are still poorly represented in French galleries.

“This exhibition, which includes more women than men, presents works made with various materials such as paper, charcoal or even fabric.

While in Oran, birthplace of Gaité’s grandmother, the curator met Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, a Franco-Algerian director, who introduced her to her mother, Fatima Idiri.

Born in Aurès, in northeastern Algeria, Idiri lived in Nancy in a family that was part of the resistance networks of the National Liberation Front.

Returning to the country after her independence, she is a self-taught artist – from styling to painting on silk, from mosaic to Berber embroidery – strongly influenced by Impressionism and Orientalism.

“Hirak’s fervor has changed the game,” she said.

By choosing figurative drawing as an artistic identity, she strives to preserve the memory of one of the traditions of her native region, the Aurès, says Gaité.

“By creating his masterpieces from coffee grounds and acrylic, the artist pays homage to the free and liberated poets and singers that are Azriat.

Idiri studies colonial photography and seeks to deconstruct images in order to rediscover the spontaneity of avant-garde artists frowned upon, even marginalized, during the colonial period.

The exhibition also includes works by Mounir Gouri, winner of the Friends of the IMA (Arab World Institute) prize.

Based in France, Gouri produces moving paintings of “harraga”, or illegal immigrants, turning their journey into a performance.

Gaité highlights a painting of a starry sky, painted in charcoal. “The message that the artist wishes to convey is that when the harraga are in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea in the dark night, the stars are their only source of light.

Works by the visual artist Amina Menia, who lives and works in Algeria, are also on display. His art takes the form of an urban archeology, centered on places and architectural language.

Menia’s works have been exhibited in numerous museums, art centers and galleries, including the Center Pompidou in Paris, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Museum of African Design in Johannesburg, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Marseille and the Royal Hibernian Academy of Dublin.

Works by Sadek Rahim, a multidisciplinary artist who lived in Syria and Jordan, and studied at the Beirut School of Fine Arts, are also presented.

“Somewhere between silence and words” takes place until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des arts de Malakoff, in the Hauts-de-Seine, in Paris.

This story was originally published in French on Arab News in English

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Silence speaks volumes as Algerian artists explore cultural heritage https://libyamazigh.org/silence-speaks-volumes-as-algerian-artists-explore-cultural-heritage/ https://libyamazigh.org/silence-speaks-volumes-as-algerian-artists-explore-cultural-heritage/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 09:45:59 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/silence-speaks-volumes-as-algerian-artists-explore-cultural-heritage/

PARIS: “Somewhere between silence and words” revives memories of a trip to Algeria made by Florian Gaite, philosopher, art critic and curator of the exhibition which runs until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des Arts Malakoff centers in Paris.

The exhibit “seeks to convey the voices and silence that characterize Algeria so well,” Gaité told Arab News in France.

“It is an attentive ear beyond the Mediterranean. Algeria is a country as well known as it is unknown, and whose complexity – social, political and historical – is equivalent to the cultural diversity expressed there.

Gaite said he set up the project before the Hirak movement and the widespread protests in Algeria in early 2019.

“It upset my vision of the Algerian scene, a country that I did not know, and on which I had prejudices and preconceived ideas from an exclusively Western reading,” he added.

“When I arrived in Algeria, I realized that the sensitive and sensory experience felt there was made up of two extremes. On the one hand, it is an extremely talkative country, where several languages ​​are spoken, a kind of linguistic tinkering. The same language is not spoken from city to city or between generations.

“The older generation speaks Amazigh, their children speak French and Arabic, and the younger generation is more Arabic and English oriented. This stratification of languages ​​seemed crazy to me because in Algeria, there is also a lot of silence. It is a country where people whisper, where there is modesty, ”he said.

Gaite said Algeria is a country “marked by many traumas and by a form of detention” because the same injuries are not discussed between generations.

“There are two pitfalls that I wanted to avoid: The first is to place myself as a Western critic coming to evoke the Algerian artistic scene, in which I am not specialized. The second consisted in choosing artists as simple mediators to bear witness to the Algerian. artistic scene. In fact, they know their country better than I do and their testimonies are more accurate and authentic.

According to the organizer of the exhibition, colonization, Islamism and state authoritarianism are among the many traumas in contemporary Algerian history.

“These are a series of causes, prohibitions, denials, repressions that hinder speech and often prevent its transcription in the form of a story. The presence of the testimony and documentary function in contemporary Algerian art thus responds to this need to bear witness to the past as well as the present – colonization, the war of liberation, socialism, the black decade, the Bouteflika era, the Hirak – and to propose rewritings, to exhume what has been erased or falsified, to give a voice to all that is forgotten, ”he declared.

“Somewhere between silence and words” brings together artists born, living or working in Algeria, including Louisa Babari, Adel Bentounsi, Walid Bouchouchi, Fatima Chafaa, Dalila Dalleas Bouzar, Mounir Gouri, Fatima Idiri, Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, Amina Menia and Sadek Rahim.

These Algerian or Franco-Algerian artists were selected by Gaité, who specifies that some are still poorly represented in French galleries.

“This exhibition, which includes more women than men, presents works made with various materials such as paper, charcoal or even fabric.

While in Oran, birthplace of Gaité’s grandmother, the curator met Sabrina Idiri Chemloul, a Franco-Algerian director, who introduced her to her mother, Fatima Idiri.

Born in Aurès, in northeastern Algeria, Idiri lived in Nancy in a family that was part of the resistance networks of the National Liberation Front.

Returning to the country after her independence, she is a self-taught artist – from styling to painting on silk, from mosaic to Berber embroidery – strongly influenced by Impressionism and Orientalism.

“Hirak’s fervor has changed the game,” she said.

By choosing figurative drawing as an artistic identity, she strives to preserve the memory of one of the traditions of her native region, the Aurès, says Gaité.

“By creating his masterpieces from coffee grounds and acrylic, the artist pays homage to the free and liberated poets and singers that are Azriat.

Idiri studies colonial photography and seeks to deconstruct images in order to rediscover the spontaneity of avant-garde artists frowned upon, even marginalized, during the colonial period.

The exhibition also includes works by Mounir Gouri, winner of the Friends of the IMA (Arab World Institute) prize.

Based in France, Gouri produces moving paintings of “harraga”, or illegal immigrants, turning their journey into a performance.

Gaité highlights a painting of a starry sky, painted in charcoal. “The message that the artist wishes to convey is that when the harraga are in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea in the dark night, the stars are their only source of light.

Works by the visual artist Amina Menia, who lives and works in Algeria, are also on display. His art takes the form of an urban archeology, centered on places and architectural language.

Menia’s works have been exhibited in numerous museums, art centers and galleries, including the Center Pompidou in Paris, the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York, the Museum of African Design in Johannesburg, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Marseille and the Royal Hibernian Academy of Dublin.

Works by Sadek Rahim, a multidisciplinary artist who lived in Syria and Jordan, and studied at the Beirut School of Fine Arts, are also presented.

“Somewhere between silence and words” takes place until November 28, 2021 at the Maison des arts de Malakoff, in the Hauts-de-Seine, in Paris.

This story was originally published in French on Arab News in English

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Madame Tussauds Dubai opens its doors https://libyamazigh.org/madame-tussauds-dubai-opens-its-doors/ https://libyamazigh.org/madame-tussauds-dubai-opens-its-doors/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 19:26:07 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/madame-tussauds-dubai-opens-its-doors/

DUBAI: Cars and clothing have a long, intertwined history. While it may seem like the two are drastically different, fashion has a long-standing relationship with the auto industry, with designers continually looking to the road when creating their collections and runway looks.

Coco Chanel’s little black dress from 1926 was inspired by Henry Ford’s model T; in the 1970s, car customizer Kenny “Von Dutch” Howard helped set the trend for trucker hats; Thierry Mugler presented a Cadillac-inspired corset in the 1980s, and more recently Demna Gvasalia transformed floor mats and mirrors into skirts and clutch bags for Balenciaga’s fall 2017 ready-to-wear collection.

Thierry Mugler Fall 1992 Ready-to-wear. Getty Images

Also in 2017, American designer and avid car collector Ralph Lauren presented his fall offer at his Bedford Hills garage for a show inspired by luxury sports cars. For the same season this year, the Casablanca designer Charaf Tajer was inspired by Formula 1 for his collection, aptly titled “Grand Prix”.

Then there are the countless automotive collaborations: the Bugatti Chiron by Hermès, the Fiat 500 monogram by Gucci and a Lamborghini Murcielago customized by Versace. Just last week, Mercedes-Benz brought in multi-stroke Virgil Abloh to redesign the Mercedes Maybach.

Les Benjamins Fall 2022. Supplied

Today, the latest brand to draw inspiration from the automotive industry is the Istanbul brand Les Benjamins, run by German Bunyamin Aydin alongside his Saudi wife Lamia, who is responsible for the women’s part of the collections of the streetwear brand.

Entitled “Forgotten Pacenotes”, the brand’s new offering for fall 2021 celebrates Turkish rally icons of the 1970s and 1980s, such as Renç Koçibey, Serdar Bostanci and Ali Sipahi, among others.

The collection, which is divided into two chapters “rally style” and “crash & repair”, is punctuated with pieces that one would find on the Grand Prix or Daytona 500 pits. There are elegant zipped leather jackets, prints oil spill, jackets and sweatpants, balaclavas, vegan leather vests and zippers emblazoned with Les Benjamins patches, evoking bright sponsor logos on heavily modified race cars.

Les Benjamins Fall 2022. Supplied

When it comes to accessories, there are running gloves, logo dad caps, and stylish handbags with magnetic clasps that open and close with the ease of a start button.

When it comes to women’s clothing, Lamia gave a sartorial nod to French driver Michèle Mouton, who became the first and only woman to win a world rally championship event in 1981.

“The legacy of racing and the stories that have inspired me, merging with my creative vision, bring together a contemporary take on rally racing,” Aydin told Arab News.

Les Benjamins Fall 2022. Supplied

The designer has always had a fascination with cars. “I love cars,” he said, adding that he is mainly interested in the design aspect and the style of dress. “I would love to design a car one day and maybe a racing team,” he added.

The new offering is available online and will also be featured in the upcoming Les Benjamins flagship store in Dubai, which will mark the predominantly gender-neutral streetwear brand’s first store in the Gulf and the wider Middle East, with the exception of Turkey.

Les Benjamins Fall 2022. Supplied

The brand, which has found fans in Kim Kardashian West, Justin Bieber and Saweetie, already has two stores in Istanbul and more than 150 dealers.

“The community we have here in Dubai has always welcomed me and Les Benjamins,” shared Aydin. “I feel at home here.”

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Egyptian model agency “decolonizes beauty standards” https://libyamazigh.org/egyptian-model-agency-decolonizes-beauty-standards/ https://libyamazigh.org/egyptian-model-agency-decolonizes-beauty-standards/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 10:54:37 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/egyptian-model-agency-decolonizes-beauty-standards/

CAIRO: Between the frantic rush of wardrobe changes and the photographers preparing for the shoots, Iman Eldeeb’s agency is slowly innovating for the Egyptian fashion scene by hiring a diverse range of models.

Eldeeb forged an international career in Milan, the fashion capital of Europe, where photographers told her she was “the first Egyptian model they had ever seen”.

Seven years later, she returned to Egypt in 2018 and set out to shake up a fashion scene where old stereotypes prevail.

In the most populous nation in the Arab world, modeling has long been dominated by “fair-skinned Eastern European girls,” Eldeeb said.


The 28-year-old said such “outdated” standards made it difficult for Egyptian and Arab models to enter the industry.

“Beauty cannot be limited by the appearance and shape of a face, etc. I think that’s a misconception of beauty, ”Eldeeb told AFP.

“The color of the hair, the color of the eyes, all of those things were part of a very old understanding of beauty and it’s something that we are moving away from as much as possible.”
According to The Fashion Spot, an industry-focused website, “models of color” made up over 43% of global fashion shows in fall 2021, making it “the most racially diverse season on record. “.

Traveling the world as a model, Eldeeb said she feels a new trend of more diverse faces and bodies is emerging.

Back in Egypt, she and her sister Yousra went on to found UNN Model Management – the name meaning ‘rebirth’ in the Nubian black minority language.

The agency provides a platform for aspiring talent in Egypt who lack support in the fiercely competitive industry.

“The fashion industry continues to develop in the Arab world,” Eldeeb said.

Today, UNN oversees around 35 contracts with major brands such as Louis Vuitton, Adidas and Levi’s, making it a leader in the nascent Egyptian scene.

Mohsen Othman, a freelance photographer also known as Lemosen who works regularly with UNN, praised the agency for its “bold” approach.

In the industry in Egypt, “we have creatives but we lack the means, and training remains outdated,” he said.

For Sabah Khodir, an Egyptian activist against gender-based violence, UNN is a force to “decolonize standards of beauty” and “to deconstruct internalized racism”.

“Being more represented in fashion, on screen or elsewhere, can save lives. It humanizes you in the eyes of the world, ”Khodir said of the plight of under-represented women.

South Sudanese model Adhar Makuac Abiem has long suffered racial taunts and slurs on the ruthless streets of Egypt’s bustling capital, Cairo.

When she moved to Egypt as a refugee in 2014, she never imagined she would be hired by a local agency.

She was often told that she was “too black” or “too ugly” to get a job, she said.

But since 2019, the 21-year-old has managed to build a modeling career by working with UNN.

Egypt is similar to “the West where prejudices persist about people with dark skin,” said Marie Grace Brown, a researcher at the University of Kansas and author of a book on women’s fashion in Sudan.

But that hasn’t stopped Abiem from trying to “become a positive role model” for young black women in the industry.

Mariam Abdallah, 22, who was busy doing her hair before a photoshoot, said she does more modeling abroad than in Egypt.

“We’re not very interested in ‘exotic’ top models,” she told AFP.

Beyond tackling discrimination in a highly predatory industry, where there have been high-profile cases of sexual misconduct, obtaining parental consent is another challenge in the conservative Muslim country.
According to Eldeeb, three quarters of parents fear that the images of their model daughters will be “abused” online.

There are also concerns about revealing clothing, as well as working “at inappropriate times” for young women.

“Whatever the profession, parents always try to decide for the girls,” “she added.

The World Bank says less than 20% of Egyptian women were employed in 2019.

But Eldeeb managed to get work visas for some of its models in France, a first for local talent.

Abdallah left Egypt for the first time recently thanks to the contracts she now has with a dozen agencies in Europe and the United States, giving her a sense of independence and raison d’être.

For activist Khodir, the focus on developing Egyptian talent for global fashion houses is more than just a good deal.

“It’s a form of healing that we badly need,” she said.


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Security forces foil separatists in Algeria https://libyamazigh.org/security-forces-foil-separatists-in-algeria/ https://libyamazigh.org/security-forces-foil-separatists-in-algeria/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 08:38:00 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/security-forces-foil-separatists-in-algeria/

Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune (File photo: Xinhua)

Algerian security services said on Wednesday it had foiled armed attacks planned by a separatist group with foreign aid, local media reported.

The DGSN security agency said police this week severed a network linked to the Movement for the Autonomy of Kabylia (MAK), a group that claims independence for the troubled region of Kabylia and that the Algeria considers it a “terrorist” organization, according to a statement released by local media.

According to the statement, 17 people were arrested in north-eastern Kabylia, accused of having planned “armed acts aimed at harming the security of the country, with the complicity of national parties advocating separatism”.

The suspects admitted to having been “in constant contact via the Internet with foreign parties operating under the guise of associations and civil society organizations” based in Israel and a country in North Africa, according to the statement. He did not identify which North African country was allegedly involved, but Algeria accused its regional rival, Morocco, of supporting the separatist MAK and in August severed ties with the kingdom, accusing it of ‘”hostile actions”.

The move came after Morocco’s envoy to the United Nations in July expressed support for self-determination in Kabylia, a stronghold of the Amazigh (Berber) minority.

Algiers firmly opposes any desire for independence in the region. Long-strained relations between Algeria and Morocco have deteriorated in recent times as conflict in the disputed Western Sahara erupted in 2020 after a long ceasefire.

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Algeria accuses Israel of helping plan separatist attack https://libyamazigh.org/algeria-accuses-israel-of-helping-plan-separatist-attack/ https://libyamazigh.org/algeria-accuses-israel-of-helping-plan-separatist-attack/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 08:08:40 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/algeria-accuses-israel-of-helping-plan-separatist-attack/

Algerian security services said on Wednesday they had foiled armed attacks planned by a separatist group receiving foreign aid – including from Israel – local media reported.

The DGSN security agency said police this week severed a network linked to the Movement for the Autonomy of Kabylia (MAK), a group that claims independence for the troubled region of Kabylia and that the Algeria considers it a “terrorist” organization, according to a statement released by local media.

According to Reuters, Algerian channel Ennahar TV said the attack was planned by separatists aided by the “Zionist entity” as well as by a country in North Africa. The second country has not been named, but Algeria has previously accused the MAK of being backed by Israel and its neighbor Morocco.

The security agency’s statement indicates that 17 people were arrested in northeastern Kabylia, accused of having planned “armed acts aimed at harming the security of the country, with the complicity of national parties advocating separatism”.

The suspects admitted to having been “in constant contact via the Internet with foreign parties operating under the guise of associations and civil society organizations” based in Israel and a country in North Africa, according to the statement.

In August Algeria Algeria has cut ties with Morocco, accusing it of “hostile actions”.

The move came after Morocco’s envoy to the United Nations in July expressed support for self-determination in Kabylia, a stronghold of the Amazigh (Berber) minority. Algiers firmly opposes any aspirations for independence in the region.

Long-standing relations between Algeria and Morocco have deteriorated in recent times as the conflict in the disputed Western Sahara erupted last year after a lengthy ceasefire.

Morocco considers the former Spanish colony to be an integral part of its kingdom, but Algeria has supported the Polisario Front, a movement seeking independence there.

Morocco’s normalization of diplomatic relations with Israel last year, as a counterpart to the American recognition of Rabat’s sovereignty over Western Sahara, also sparked new tensions with Algeria, a supporter of the Palestinian cause.

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Films showing at the 5th edition of the El Gouna Film Festival https://libyamazigh.org/films-showing-at-the-5th-edition-of-the-el-gouna-film-festival/ https://libyamazigh.org/films-showing-at-the-5th-edition-of-the-el-gouna-film-festival/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 06:30:22 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/films-showing-at-the-5th-edition-of-the-el-gouna-film-festival/

El Gouna Film Festival Screening Award Winning Films “Amira”, “Plumes” with Mixed Reactions

DUBAI: The El Gouna Egyptian Film Festival screened on Tuesday Egyptian director Mohamed Diab’s award-winning film “Amira,” which premiered at the 78th Venice Film Festival this year.

The film revolves around Amira, a 17-year-old Palestinian woman who has lived her entire life believing that she is the biological daughter of a Palestinian prisoner serving a life sentence in an Israeli prison.

The film, set in the West Bank of Palestine, stars a stellar pan-Arab cast, including Jordanian star Saba Mubarak, Palestinian-Israeli actor Ali Suliman and emerging Jordanian actress Tara Abboud, who landed her first leading role. as Amira.

The film revolves around Amira, a 17-year-old Palestinian woman who has lived her entire life believing that she is the biological daughter of a Palestinian prisoner serving a life sentence in an Israeli prison. (El Gouna Film Festival)

“Amira” won two prestigious awards at the Venice International Film Festival – the Lanterna Magica Prize and the Interfilm Prize.

It is in competition for the Feature Narrative Award in El Gouna.

The film was also screened at the recent Toronto Film Festival.

On Monday, the festival screened the Egyptian film “Plumes”, directed by Omar El-Zohairy.

However, the film – which won the Cannes Film Festival Critics’ Week Grand Prix – sparked controversy at the event and on social media.

Some Egyptian filmmakers and actors, including Sherif Mounir, Ahmed Rizk and Ashraf Abdel Baqi, left the screening of the film because they believed the film offended Egypt.

Some Egyptian filmmakers and actors, including Sherif Mounir, left the screening of the film because they believed the film offended Egypt. (AFP)

“Feathers” tells the story of a mother who dedicates her life to her husband and children. When a magic trick goes awry at her four-year-old son’s birthday party, an avalanche of fortuitous nonsense descends on the family. The magician transforms her husband, the authoritarian father, into a chicken.

The mother is now forced to put herself forward and take care of the family while trying to bring her husband back. As she tries to survive, she undergoes a brutal transformation.

In a phone interview with Egyptian host Amr Adib on his show ‘Al-Hekaya’, Mounir said: “When I left (the screening), I was followed by others right after me. What I saw, and the image in the film, portrayed us (the Egyptians) in a negative way. It shows people suffering abnormally.

“Even the poor neighborhoods, which ‘were’ there, did not live so badly. I was disappointed to be honest. I was also disappointed that when it premiered abroad it won awards, ”he said. “I no longer see this image (or these struggles) in our country.”

The Egyptian film “Plumes” is directed by Omar El-Zohairy. (Provided)

“I don’t know what the people who awarded the film liked about this film,” he added.

Egyptian news agency Al-Masry Al-Youm shared a statement released by the festival that said, “The El-Gouna Film Festival values ​​and appreciates all filmmakers around the world for their outstanding art and cinematic experiences. The festival team selects the films according to their artistic and cinematographic qualities, according to the standards of international film festivals.

“This year, in its fifth edition, the selection of the film ‘Feathers’ by Egyptian director Omar El-Zohairy is part of the film selection process, based on its success in other international forums,” the statement added.

Speaking of its Cannes award, the festival organizers added: “This is the first Egyptian film to receive such a prestigious award. He also won the Grand Prix of the Pingyao Festival in China yesterday. It will be screened at the next Carthage Festival.

“Regarding the opinions of many Egyptian and international critics, the setting and time of the film has not been identified… films,” the statement read.

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“Indigenous in Connecticut Universities” and the Need for Community https://libyamazigh.org/indigenous-in-connecticut-universities-and-the-need-for-community/ https://libyamazigh.org/indigenous-in-connecticut-universities-and-the-need-for-community/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/indigenous-in-connecticut-universities-and-the-need-for-community/

In honor of Indigenous Peoples Week, the Native American Cultural Programs at the University of Connecticut have hosted a number of virtual events, each scheduled on different days. Tuesday’s event, titled “Indigenous in Connecticut Universities,” had a lot to do with discussing the value of Indigenous communities, as students from UConn, Yale University and Quinnipiac University gave their own perspective on how their Indigenous identities coincide with their academic environment.

Photo by Andreas Wagner on Unsplash

The panel was moderated by Zoe Blevins, vice-president of the Native and Native American Students Association at UConn, who opened the floor for the eight panelists to introduce themselves. In the middle of their introduction, Nolan Arkansas, a fifth semester American Studies student of Cherokee descent, recounted how an impromptu trip to the Native American Cultural Center prompted their decision to go to Yale.

“I stayed here for a weekend with another Native student… and I was still deciding, ‘Do I want to go here? Don’t I want to go here? ‘ Arkansas said. “We went to the Native American Cultural Center… and we were so tired and so [my friend] and i just sat on that little sofa in one of the halls and we both fell asleep around 6pm … when we woke up we woke up smelling rye bread because the students older ones cooked us dinner. Then we all shared food together and we were just making jokes and it was hot; it was inviting and I felt like I felt at home in the aboriginal community which is a huge privilege and such an amazing feeling because not everyone feels at home.

When asked about the research and development process of Indigenous and Indigenous communities within their schools, panelists Kiara Tanta-Quidgeon, Sage Phillips, Hema Patel and Evan Roberts offered their views on the issue.

Tanta-Quidgeon, an eighth semester health sciences student of Mohegan origin, spoke about her own personal struggles as the founder and president of the Indigenous Student Union of Quinnipiac, and how those struggles continued. to surface even after overcoming them. Despite this, she stressed the importance of having these communities readily available to prospective students.

“It has certainly been a challenge, but it makes me really happy to know that now when students will come here in the future – especially native students or native students or just students interested in culture and history indigenous identities – they will have that space to share that and they will have that sense of community that many of us did not have even when we arrived on campus and that many students before us did not ” , Tanta-Quidgeon said.

Phillips, a seventh semester double major in political science and human rights from Penobscot and president of NAISA, outlined the reasons for founding NAISA at UConn.

“I found out that the NACP itself, the title didn’t contain ‘Native’,” Phillips said. “So the native students weren’t comfortable here and that was a problem because we had requests from native students who were like, ‘Do I belong to NACP? As the students asked “Do you think I belong? And that’s when I was like ‘Okay, time out.’ Yes sure your place is here, but how are we going to go about changing that and making sure these students feel welcome here? That’s why we launched NAISA.

Patel, a fifth semester in the history of science, health, medicine and education, a double major of Turtle Mountain Ojibwe and Gujarati American descent, followed Phillips’ contribution with a similar sentiment, citing the need improvement of Yale within its Indigenous and Indigenous community.

“Even though we’ve been here since 2013 – so almost 10 years – it’s still moving forward so slowly, there’s still so much to do, [with] not enough people to do it, ”Patel said. “It’s very inspiring to see what you both did at UConn and QU because you have the word ‘Aboriginal’ in your band title and we still don’t have it, even though we have our bands. longer. ”

Regarding Phillips and Patel’s comment, Roberts, a fifth semester student in ethnic studies of Lingít descent, continued Patel’s conversation about the indigenous and indigenous communities of Yale.

“I was thinking about this because we were discussing our name and the exclusivity [our organizations] can appear to people who are not just indigenous to North America, ”said Roberts. “We have also counted and tried to fight anti-darkness in our community, as we begin to see how it plays a role in our community and in all Indigenous communities. So I think there will always be work to do to create spaces somewhere that [are] comfortable and welcoming and a place of joy for everyone. ”

The final question asked what advice the panelists would offer to potential Indigenous students seeking higher education, to which Samantha Gove, Rania Bensadok and Sofia Saul voiced their responses.

Gove, a double major in Sociology and Psychological Sciences in the third semester of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation and Secretary of NAISA, stressed the importance of finding indigenous communities and having the courage to build them when they are not found.

“It can be difficult to go through education feeling invisible and disabled, but most importantly you will find communities that see you and resonate with you, as we all here, thankfully,” said Gove. “And if you don’t, you can build that up and be a part of it for yourself and for others. It’s a difficult thing to do, but it’s really important to find these communities because they’re going to make it work better, not just for everyone involved now, but for everyone who will be involved in the future.

Bensadok, a seventh semester in Philosophy and Political Science of the Amazigh People under Tizi Ouzou, shared Gove’s point of view by adding a personal anecdote about his arrival at ISU in Quinnipiac.

“I was part of several organizations on campus before ISU became an organization, and I always felt that the community questioned my identity,” Bensadok said. “The ISU was the first place you could learn more about your background, research and understand the history of your people, as if there was no shame in it. So one advice I would give is never to settle down until you find comfort. And if that means working and building the community and group you need, so be it. ”

Saul, a seventh semester political science student of Puerto Rican Taino descent and president of social media for NAISA, then made a lasting comment on how to overcome doubts about integration and advised embracing spaces that allow indigenous identities to thrive.

“I definitely had this feeling of, ‘I’m not Native, I’m not Native, I’m Native; where do I fit in? ‘ – this struggle, ”Saul said. “But I think I would definitely like to give advice to [students]; as if you might not think it’s for you, but if you think about it, you will be welcome. I had these fears of “I’m not supposed to be here,” but it’s your culture, it’s my culture and it’s a place that should be open to find out more about it. ”

For more information on these organizations and other events during Indigenous Peoples Week, be sure to visit @uconn_nacp, @yalenatives, and @quindigenousstudentunion on Instagram.


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Acclaimed Irish author rejects Hebrew translation of latest book https://libyamazigh.org/acclaimed-irish-author-rejects-hebrew-translation-of-latest-book/ https://libyamazigh.org/acclaimed-irish-author-rejects-hebrew-translation-of-latest-book/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 12:42:24 +0000 https://libyamazigh.org/acclaimed-irish-author-rejects-hebrew-translation-of-latest-book/

DUBAI: Mexican-American actress Salma Hayek appeared on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” in Los Angeles this weekend wearing a fiery leopard-print suit from Lebanese designer Elie Saab.

The actress, of Spanish and Lebanese descent, appeared on the TV show alongside fellow actor Kumail Nanjiani to talk about their latest film, Marvel’s “The Eternals”.

For the occasion, she looked glamorous in a coordinated Saab ensemble from the designer’s pre-fall 2021 collection.

The animal print wide leg pants featured a single black stripe on each leg, while the fitted blazer sported black lapels and was worn over a sheer black top with a high neck.

(Getty Images)

The star-studded cast of the film includes Hayek, Nanjiani, Angelina Jolie, Richard Madden and Syrian refugee teenager turned actor Zain Al-Rafeea, among others.

Directed by Oscar winner Chloe Zhao, the plot centers on an immortal alien race with superhuman powers who have secretly lived on Earth for thousands of years. The film is slated to hit theaters in November.

Chatting with the Jimmy Kimmel host on Thursday, Hayek revealed why her co-star Jolie had her face smashed in a birthday cake in a video that went viral online in September.

When the show host asked about her 55th birthday celebration last month, Hayek said, “There was no birthday party. All of these people were crashers. said, ‘I don’t want a birthday party this year.’ I had to work all day. Twenty-five people, who I told them there was no birthday party, showed up anyway, ”she said, referring to the party documented in her September Instagram post.

The actress went on to explain that it’s a Mexican birthday tradition to embed a person’s face in their cake – and Jolie was put in charge of this work.

In the video, a group of friends gather around the actress chanting “Mordida! as Jolie buries Hayek’s face in her birthday cake.

“After you’ve blown out the candles, you have to bite,” Hayek explained to Kimmel. “It means a bite to eat. You have to bite the cake with your mouth, without your hands holding on or anything. Then there’s always one that comes hitting you and thrusting your face into the cake.

“We were starting, ‘Mordida!’ She said, ‘What’s going on?’ Hayek said of Jolie’s apparent confusion over tradition, before she had fun and smashed Hayek’s face in the coconut cake.

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